Help me setup my suspension - Yamaha R1 Forum: YZF-R1 Forums
Yamaha R1 - R1M Suspension Setup, Tires, and Wheels Discuss the Yamaha R1M suspension setups you like most, what tires you are running and other related components.

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post #1 of 38 (permalink) Old 07-29-2015, 04:12 PM Thread Starter
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Help me setup my suspension

Hey,
I´ve got a base model R1 and have the oem settings on my suspensión. It´s too stiff.

I mostly Street ride and I feel it bounces so much I can´t keep a steady throttle.

I have no clue about damping, compression, etc. Can anybody point me in the right direction?
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post #2 of 38 (permalink) Old 07-29-2015, 04:42 PM
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Its a stiff fork over sharp bumps. Make sure you have the tire pressures correct. I wouldn't go much over 33-35 psi cold or you will feel every crack in the road.

You can take out some compression in the fork by turning the COMP counter-clockwise but it doesn't help that much. That said I think mine is almost all the way out...like -20 clicks out from closed.

Try PWR 3 on the street...it's a bit easier to hold a steady throttle and its not as jerky...
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post #3 of 38 (permalink) Old 07-29-2015, 05:14 PM Thread Starter
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yeah where I live it´s bumpy roads everywhere so I´m struggling with it(not to mention how hard on the seat it is.. feel like my kidney is gonna give). Thought about that Dave Moss article that suggests pretty much soften all comp, rebound and preload to the max. Worries me a bit.. doubt suspensión can be compliant like that.

Will try pwr 3 as well.
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post #4 of 38 (permalink) Old 08-14-2015, 04:24 AM
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New r1 sure is stiff as hell, I bought a seat from saddlemen for my 14 r1 and made a huge difference when it comes to ride comfort, I've contacted them about the 15 and they said that by the end of the year there might be some seats available, one of the best upgrade I've made
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post #5 of 38 (permalink) Old 02-24-2016, 08:55 PM
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Get the proper spring rate for your weight. I have to do the same. KTech is the only company offering springs for our bikes (non-M). These are waaay too stiff for the street. It truely is a track bike. Springs are $63 and you need 2. I havent decided what I am going to do for the rear. Probably Ohlins when I pay off my new leathers.

I dont know what Yamaha was thinking with such stiff spring rate (1.0). They usually come stock with .8 springs. (160lb rider).

Spend the money for springs, you will enjoy the bike more when street riding.
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post #6 of 38 (permalink) Old 02-24-2016, 09:04 PM
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The M has a stiff spring not the base R1. I'm 150lbs and can use most of the fork travel while riding public roads.
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post #7 of 38 (permalink) Old 02-25-2016, 01:45 PM
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Fork spring is 9.0 N/mm and your Yamaha dealer can get a 8.5 N/mm (part number 2CR-23141-A0)
Your rear spring is 88 N/mm and you can get a 83 N/mm (part number 2CR-22222-A0)

You can also play with oil level and viscosity.
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post #8 of 38 (permalink) Old 02-25-2016, 02:41 PM Thread Starter
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found also that MATRIS makes springs for the oem kyb as well.
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post #9 of 38 (permalink) Old 02-25-2016, 03:14 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rivmin View Post
Fork spring is 9.0 N/mm and your Yamaha dealer can get a 8.5 N/mm (part number 2CR-23141-A0)
Your rear spring is 88 N/mm and you can get a 83 N/mm (part number 2CR-22222-A0)

You can also play with oil level and viscosity.
Actually,
the non M fork spring is 18.12N/mm
the rear shock spring is 88.20N/mm

I am looking at the SPEC in the service manual right now. Big difference. The springs are SUPER STIFF. I need 9.0N springs so I can have more adjustment on the bike.

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post #10 of 38 (permalink) Old 02-25-2016, 03:27 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UB6IB9 View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by rivmin View Post
Fork spring is 9.0 N/mm and your Yamaha dealer can get a 8.5 N/mm (part number 2CR-23141-A0)
Your rear spring is 88 N/mm and you can get a 83 N/mm (part number 2CR-22222-A0)

You can also play with oil level and viscosity.
Actually,
the non M fork spring is 18.12N/mm
the rear shock spring is 88.20N/mm

I am looking at the SPEC in the service manual right now. Big difference. The springs are SUPER STIFF. I need 9.0N springs so I can have more adjustment on the bike.
Ok...

If you believe this, then please go out to your bike and take the spring out of one leg, problem solved.

Have you ridden it on the track? Put a zip tie on one of the legs if you haven't already and check what you're getting for stroke. Hit a long braking zone and threshold brake long enough to bypass any compression settings.

You do not need 1/2 the spring rate that is in there now.

The bike is not sprung overly stiff...otherwise how do you explain my complaints that it's too soft when I weigh in at 150lbs. (and use 85-90% of available fork travel)??

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post #11 of 38 (permalink) Old 02-25-2016, 03:34 PM
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Originally Posted by gsa013 View Post
Hey,
I´ve got a base model R1 and have the oem settings on my suspensión. It´s too stiff.

I mostly Street ride and I feel it bounces so much I can´t keep a steady throttle.

I have no clue about damping, compression, etc. Can anybody point me in the right direction?
It feels "bumpy" or "stiff" at slower speeds hitting manhole covers and such, compared to some other bikes but at pace on a track it is not too stiff, like I already suggested check what you're getting for stroke, you'll likely be surprised (unless you really don't know how to threshold brake).
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post #12 of 38 (permalink) Old 02-25-2016, 03:40 PM
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I have not tracked it yet, but have taken corners over 140 and it rails yes. But over bumps and very technical turns its almost un-rideable for me. I have a zip tie on fork and am using 3/4 of travel but I have everything else set too soft to compensate for the spring rate.

Honestly I dont know what the rate is as you pointed out the manual is wrong. My suspension guy who is a reputable track-side service told me they are 10N springs in my bike. The bike feels like they are. Too stiff for me. I want more control of my compression settings.

I am usually content with the front springs on Yamahas out of the box, I just change the shock in rear to Ohlins 9N and am good to go. This thing is not good out of the box for me. I need to get to the track, but when you are comfortable you are fast... Right now, I am not comfortable on this thing. Im starting with springs.

Im not slow, I top the charts whenever I go to the track unless AMA guys are there. This bike needs alot of work.

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post #13 of 38 (permalink) Old 02-25-2016, 04:55 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gsa013 View Post
Hey,
I´ve got a base model R1 and have the oem settings on my suspensión. It´s too stiff.

I mostly Street ride and I feel it bounces so much I can´t keep a steady throttle.

I have no clue about damping, compression, etc. Can anybody point me in the right direction?
Google is your friend. Read all of these first, and DON'T try to think about how you'll 'fix' your problem until you've read them all:
How to Adjust your Motorcycle Suspension | Motorcyclist Online
How to adjust sportsbike suspension | MCN
Sportbike Suspension Guide | Sport Rider
Motorcycle Setup Method
How to set up your motorcycle suspension - Motorbike Writer
Motorcycle Suspension Set-up
Suspension Tuning Guide ? ROADRACE MOTORCYCLES

Troubleshooting: Motorcycle Suspension: - A Troubleshooting Guide - Motorcycles


Different writers explain the same concepts in different ways. Some people get some things right, others get other bits right. Also, if someone tells you they have 'the right settings' slap them with a wet fish. they're full of it. If OEM forks were made to the same tolerances and quality as Ohlins/Andreani then maybe - settings from one fork would translate to another. But the variances between fork & shock damping character on different OEM components is huge. They're not high quality parts, the valving is about $40 worth of parts and the cartridges are made to a super cheap price point with large tolerances. They're designed to last a long time, not actually damp precisely. Plus, the varying stage of oil decay in different mileage bikes means no setting will translate to another bike the same.

You need to understand what each clicker does, and adjust to suit. You need to also get some 'butt feel' for what each clicker does, and then get a feel for what adjustment on each clicker does to your butt feel when riding.

Compression: what is compression? To demonstrate, make fists. Extend your arms directly in front of you (like, actually do it.) Pretend that a force is pushing your arms back towards your chest, so that they fold and your fists end up next to you. That force pushing your arms inwards, is compression.

Rebound: Now push back. The force pushing your arms to extend again is Rebound. Rebound is the stored energy in the spring, which is pushing the suspension back out. Rebound DAMPING is the hydraulic valving which slows down the rate at which the spring can unload it's energy. If you have nothing slowing your arms from extending really quickly, your arms can fly out as fast as you want. Now, imagine you have some sort of, say, rowing machine, that as hard as you push against it, it only allows your arms to extend really slowly. That's what Rebound damping does. The rebound stack only lets a certain amount of oil pass through it at a certain rate... the spring is pushing really hard to extend the fork/shock again, but the rebound damping stack is slowing it's extension down.

There are 2 stacks inside your fork/shock: Rebound & compression. The compression stack controls how fast compression can happen (oilflow through the stack). Ditto Rebound.

So... if your forks feel really harsh over small bumps, which one would you adjust? Bumps are doing what to the forks - pushing them in - so, you'd back off compression.

Now, don't be a bitch here. So many people are fear-living bitches. Back the Comp off ALL THE WAY. Take it for a decent test ride of at least 20 minutes. Do some corners (low speed, take it easy), over some bumps, do some braking tests, etc. Don't do a high speed run FFS, you have no idea what the setting will feel like, take it easy. See what it feels like. Is it shit? Is it too soft? Does it make the bike wallow in corners? Does it make the front end feel wobbly, does it unsettle the chassis? Have a solid think about what the front end is actually doing in corners, on bumps, etc. This is why you need a decent long ride where you're relaxed, and you can have a solid think about what is going on.

THEN - add 4 compression clicks. Take it for a test ride. What's changed? Is it better? Worse? No difference? Cool. Add 4 more clicks. Repeat. Add 4 more - repeat. Do this until you don't like the compression feel.

By this stage, you will probably have over-shot the perfect compression for you. Back it off 4 clicks, ride again. Advance **2 clicks**. Is this a good compromise between a bit too soft and a bit too harsh?

Do the same with Rebound.

Hint: only change one setting at a time. Don't be a hero and muck about with Rebound on the Shock, Comp on the forks, and add preload at the same time. I've been tuning my own suspension for ages, even I'm not good enough to cope with those many changes at once.

Finally, good luck. Learning how to tweak your own suspension is one of the best journeys. You'll get to the stage where you ride out in the morning with some settings, and as the day goes on you'll make an adjustments to suit a different road, or the day will heat up and your fork oil won't be as cold and thick, so you'll increase Rebound to keep the feeling you like. I do this all the time. Or, I'll ride out in the heat of the day, then find myself riding back on a cold rainy evening and the rain on my forks is chilling them right down, so my fork oil is thicker. I'll back off Comp & Ten (Rebound is also called Ten) so that my suspension is softer, so that my tyre holds to the road better in wet and rainy conditions.

Knowing what your suspension settings do, and being able to change your suspension to suit your riding style & conditions, is a really cool thing.

Good judgement comes from experience, and a lot of that comes from bad judgement.
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post #14 of 38 (permalink) Old 02-25-2016, 06:52 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UB6IB9 View Post
Actually,
the non M fork spring is 18.12N/mm
the rear shock spring is 88.20N/mm

I am looking at the SPEC in the service manual right now. Big difference. The springs are SUPER STIFF. I need 9.0N springs so I can have more adjustment on the bike.
From what I've read the 2015 they rate the total spring rate (both springs). Not sure where that started, but that would put you back in 9N/nm per spring range. Or back into the 0.9 kg/mm range most bikes have been coming with for the last several years.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TwentySixRed View Post
Google is your friend. Read all of these first, and DON'T try to think about how you'll 'fix' your problem until you've read them all:
How to Adjust your Motorcycle Suspension | Motorcyclist Online
How to adjust sportsbike suspension | MCN
Sportbike Suspension Guide | Sport Rider
Motorcycle Setup Method
How to set up your motorcycle suspension - Motorbike Writer
Motorcycle Suspension Set-up
Suspension Tuning Guide ? ROADRACE MOTORCYCLES

Troubleshooting: Motorcycle Suspension: - A Troubleshooting Guide - Motorcycles


Different writers explain the same concepts in different ways. Some people get some things right, others get other bits right. Also, if someone tells you they have 'the right settings' slap them with a wet fish. they're full of it. If OEM forks were made to the same tolerances and quality as Ohlins/Andreani then maybe - settings from one fork would translate to another. But the variances between fork & shock damping character on different OEM components is huge. They're not high quality parts, the valving is about $40 worth of parts and the cartridges are made to a super cheap price point with large tolerances. They're designed to last a long time, not actually damp precisely. Plus, the varying stage of oil decay in different mileage bikes means no setting will translate to another bike the same.

You need to understand what each clicker does, and adjust to suit. You need to also get some 'butt feel' for what each clicker does, and then get a feel for what adjustment on each clicker does to your butt feel when riding.

Compression: what is compression? To demonstrate, make fists. Extend your arms directly in front of you (like, actually do it.) Pretend that a force is pushing your arms back towards your chest, so that they fold and your fists end up next to you. That force pushing your arms inwards, is compression.

Rebound: Now push back. The force pushing your arms to extend again is Rebound. Rebound is the stored energy in the spring, which is pushing the suspension back out. Rebound DAMPING is the hydraulic valving which slows down the rate at which the spring can unload it's energy. If you have nothing slowing your arms from extending really quickly, your arms can fly out as fast as you want. Now, imagine you have some sort of, say, rowing machine, that as hard as you push against it, it only allows your arms to extend really slowly. That's what Rebound damping does. The rebound stack only lets a certain amount of oil pass through it at a certain rate... the spring is pushing really hard to extend the fork/shock again, but the rebound damping stack is slowing it's extension down.

There are 2 stacks inside your fork/shock: Rebound & compression. The compression stack controls how fast compression can happen (oilflow through the stack). Ditto Rebound.

So... if your forks feel really harsh over small bumps, which one would you adjust? Bumps are doing what to the forks - pushing them in - so, you'd back off compression.

Now, don't be a bitch here. So many people are fear-living bitches. Back the Comp off ALL THE WAY. Take it for a decent test ride of at least 20 minutes. Do some corners (low speed, take it easy), over some bumps, do some braking tests, etc. Don't do a high speed run FFS, you have no idea what the setting will feel like, take it easy. See what it feels like. Is it shit? Is it too soft? Does it make the bike wallow in corners? Does it make the front end feel wobbly, does it unsettle the chassis? Have a solid think about what the front end is actually doing in corners, on bumps, etc. This is why you need a decent long ride where you're relaxed, and you can have a solid think about what is going on.

THEN - add 4 compression clicks. Take it for a test ride. What's changed? Is it better? Worse? No difference? Cool. Add 4 more clicks. Repeat. Add 4 more - repeat. Do this until you don't like the compression feel.

By this stage, you will probably have over-shot the perfect compression for you. Back it off 4 clicks, ride again. Advance **2 clicks**. Is this a good compromise between a bit too soft and a bit too harsh?

Do the same with Rebound.

Hint: only change one setting at a time. Don't be a hero and muck about with Rebound on the Shock, Comp on the forks, and add preload at the same time. I've been tuning my own suspension for ages, even I'm not good enough to cope with those many changes at once.

Finally, good luck. Learning how to tweak your own suspension is one of the best journeys. You'll get to the stage where you ride out in the morning with some settings, and as the day goes on you'll make an adjustments to suit a different road, or the day will heat up and your fork oil won't be as cold and thick, so you'll increase Rebound to keep the feeling you like. I do this all the time. Or, I'll ride out in the heat of the day, then find myself riding back on a cold rainy evening and the rain on my forks is chilling them right down, so my fork oil is thicker. I'll back off Comp & Ten (Rebound is also called Ten) so that my suspension is softer, so that my tyre holds to the road better in wet and rainy conditions.

Knowing what your suspension settings do, and being able to change your suspension to suit your riding style & conditions, is a really cool thing.
Good reading.


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post #15 of 38 (permalink) Old 02-25-2016, 08:16 PM
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I thought we covered this before?? Maybe Deja vu?? but the springs really aren't that stiff in the forks. However the high speed damping is real stiff. That's why you feel every bump and crack in the road. And at the same time you can bottom the fork out under braking quite easily. Kinda the worst of both worlds. Not sure you can fix this KYB fork without playing around inside. I've played with the compression settings on the fork and I didn't see much improvement in the ride. I think if you remove all the compression with the adjuster which is the low speed comp you just make the brake dive even worse without improving the ride quality. That's kinda what I found anyways...
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post #16 of 38 (permalink) Old 02-25-2016, 08:59 PM
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Originally Posted by superfly999 View Post
I thought we covered this before?? Maybe Deja vu?? but the springs really aren't that stiff in the forks. However the high speed damping is real stiff. That's why you feel every bump and crack in the road. And at the same time you can bottom the fork out under braking quite easily. Kinda the worst of both worlds. Not sure you can fix this KYB fork without playing around inside. I've played with the compression settings on the fork and I didn't see much improvement in the ride. I think if you remove all the compression with the adjuster which is the low speed comp you just make the brake dive even worse without improving the ride quality. That's kinda what I found anyways...
If that's the case, yeah. Needs a revalve for the street.

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post #17 of 38 (permalink) Old 02-25-2016, 09:04 PM
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From what I've read the 2015 they rate the total spring rate (both springs). Not sure where that started, but that would put you back in 9N/nm per spring range. Or back into the 0.9 kg/mm range most bikes have been coming with for the last several years.
Dan, Thanks. That makes sense, I had my force converter out and wast trying to understand how to get the math right. Adding both forks, as you stated puts them right at 9N per spring.

This thread has ended up helping me alot. My front spring rate is where it needed to be. Still hate the front end feedback right now, even after putting a Power cup on.

Maybe the valving can be improved to get that front end working for me.

Quote:
Originally Posted by superfly999 View Post
I thought we covered this before?? Maybe Deja vu?? but the springs really aren't that stiff in the forks. However the high speed damping is real stiff. That's why you feel every bump and crack in the road. And at the same time you can bottom the fork out under braking quite easily. Kinda the worst of both worlds. Not sure you can fix this KYB fork without playing around inside. I've played with the compression settings on the fork and I didn't see much improvement in the ride. I think if you remove all the compression with the adjuster which is the low speed comp you just make the brake dive even worse without improving the ride quality. That's kinda what I found anyways...
Yes, as stated maybe I need to see what else I can do instead of spring rate as 9N is what I would have bought for springs. yes removing the compression just made it worse.

Im struggling. but I do want to thank both you guys. This has been informative. Sorry to thread jack. Twentysixred posted some info that will help out the OP with setup.

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post #18 of 38 (permalink) Old 02-25-2016, 09:54 PM
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The only easy way I thought of to change the highspeed comp would be swap in thinner fork oil but when I looked into it the OEM Yamaha fluid is apparently one of the thinnest already. So my next thought was a set of aftermarket fork internals or just bite the bullet and buy some Ohlins road and track forks...don't know if anyone has come up with a good solution for the KYB fork...and I was pretty much set on buying some ohlins forks but with the whole recall issue I'm hesitating on spending big dollars on this machine. I might not be keeping it as long as I originally planned...

If Honda can get its head out of its ass maybe I'll buy a 2017 CBR...

Also twentysixred is talking low speed compression when he's saying change the comp setting...Don't think of this setting as only for bumps - its more for slower shaft speed damping like brake dive...not cracks and pot holes...

To fix the high speed damping you need to work with the shimm stacks and fluid weight and valving. I suppose you may help the ride by backing out the low speed compression but honestly you're going to suffer under braking on track as the fork will blow right through the stroke to the bottom and that will make for crap handling. Getting the damping curve right is pretty tough and what works for a smooth track wouldn't be good for a bumpy track...This KYB fork would probably be excellent on a smooth Motogp track. But on the local bombed out track its not so great.
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Last edited by superfly999; 02-25-2016 at 10:06 PM.
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post #19 of 38 (permalink) Old 02-25-2016, 10:24 PM
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Originally Posted by UB6IB9 View Post
Dan, Thanks. That makes sense, I had my force converter out and wast trying to understand how to get the math right. Adding both forks, as you stated puts them right at 9N per spring.

This thread has ended up helping me alot. My front spring rate is where it needed to be. Still hate the front end feedback right now, even after putting a Power cup on.

Maybe the valving can be improved to get that front end working for me.



Yes, as stated maybe I need to see what else I can do instead of spring rate as 9N is what I would have bought for springs. yes removing the compression just made it worse.

Im struggling. but I do want to thank both you guys. This has been informative. Sorry to thread jack. Twentysixred posted some info that will help out the OP with setup.
Hmmm. First thing in your case is to check what the correct spring rate is for your full-gear weight. If the springs are close enough, THEN you move on to valving...

Valving. If @superfly999 is correct, and the high speed damping is the problem here, then you're not going to solve your handling problems by changing springs, or adjusting Low Speed Comp. I don't have a lot of time to write a really good 'teaching' post on this, so forgive me if I don't make much sense...

There's many ways to cheaply achieve a handling characteristic for a stock bike. If the '15-'16 R1 is really track focused, and Yamaha are addressing high speed stability through a hardcore high speed compression approach, there's several ways they can do this:

1. Piston design. Port size + the number of ports + port shape all have an effect on oil flow. Oil flow is your damping. Maximum oil flow potential is your maximum damping ability. Hell you can actually control the maximum amount of compression/rebound JUST BY port size and shape! It's a cheap shitty way but a lot of manufacturers do it as it's simple, easy, and you really don't have to put anywhere near as much engineering time into shim stack configuration compromises.

2. Shim Stack design aka valving. Shims are basically really thin, springy flat washers that flex when oil pressure from the Comp/Ten ports hit them. Sitting over the exit of the Comp/Ten ports on either side of the piston is a stack of shims. Depending on the speed and force of the oil pressure, depends how much they flex. The shims seal the ports by default, and when the piston is on the Comp stroke in a fork/shock, the oil pressure is pressing against the Reb/Ten shims, sealing them over the Rebound ports, at the same time that it is flowing into the Comp port intakes. The Comp port intakes are on the edge of the piston, outside of the OD (outer diameter) of the Rebound shims, allowing oil to flow into the Comp ports, at which, the ports route the oil inwards, to the inner diameter of the Piston to force the oil against the Comp shims, pushing them open, breaking the seal the Comp shims are making on the other side of the piston face. During the Rebound stroke, the oil pushes on the Comp shim stack, flows into the Rebound ports, which is then directed inwards to force the Rebound shim stack open. Tuning your shim stack is actually not too hard when you know how they work. (Shim stack tuning is also called 'revalving')

right. So, if you're an engineer, you can control maximum compression through 2 basic ways: Maximum flow of the piston port, OR, maximum flow of the shim stack. Thing is, shims 'wear out' over time. After a while, shims don't seal cleanly on the piston face either. This is caused by 2 things:
1. Piston face wear - the shims 'slap' and 'flutter' on the piston face, beating tiny grooves into it.
2. Shim 'wear'. You bend metal enough times, with enough heat and repeated pressure, and the metal doesn't bend back perfectly after a while.

The shims slapping the shit out of the pistons and deforming their faces, and the shims also not bending back to perfectly flat, results in a degradation of damping over time. Because the oil leaks past the shim/piston seal, and more force is required to flex the shim stack and give you the desired damping curve.

So, what do you do?
- Replace shims and valves on a regular basis (MotoGP, WSBK) because 1/100th of a second actually does mean win or lose;
- Design the piston so the Comp & Rebound ports only ever flow a maximum value of x.

Now you see why Yamaha might have a really good reason to create the pistons in their latest R1 with small oil ports. It's a very simple way to ensure that the compression a fork gives will always have a maximum value close to the desired handling characteristic you've decided that chassis should have. It would also primarily affect the high speed compression circuit, which is typically where a track bike has the most restriction. Controlling High Speed comp through a shim stack on a bike designed for pure track is the best option for a race team, but not for an OEM. Controlling high speed comp through port design on a track bike, for an OEM, would be the best option - the shim stack can go to hell, it can be bent and warped and the piston can be slapped to shit, it doesn't matter too much because you'll get on the track and the maximum port flow takes care of it.

Point? If you've got the correct springs or close enough, and you've wound out the Comp as soft as you can and you still hate the high speed comp characteristics, then the option you must look at is:
- Revalve with a different shim stack + piston.

There's several places out there you can go to for a new valve stack, and they all do different approaches to get the same result. Ohlins will do the job, but I don't like the port sizes on their off-the-shelf valving kits. The NIX carts are great, but many riders take a while to adjust to the very different damping characteristics. Racetech have a kit, but, their solution is not elegant. It's like doing surgery with a hammer. There might be surgeons out there who are ****ing wizards with a hammer, but it's still a damn hammer and it's a really blunt and crude way. Penske IMO are great, but their off-the-shelf kits are not great; you need a very clued up suspension engineer who has asked you a lot of questions, to pick the right bits from their catalogue and build a valve stack. K Tech have a great marketing team and they've got a lot of data around Irish Road Racing & Isle of Man TT, but their standard stuff is a one-size-fits-all approach. They're better than Racetech but not as good as Ohlins fundamentally (wish I had more time, it's much more complicated than that - Ohlins fundamentals are much better, Ohlins solve some problems K Tech have not yet, but K Tech work around that by compensating in other areas creating their own unique problems)

GP Suspension made really, really good solutions when Dave Hodges ran the show, he understood road applications and could make something that actually directly solved *YOUR* needs. I'm not sure if Dave is still going @ GP, and how effectively he has passed on the baton. If he is still there and still designing things, give him your money. He can ship a valve stack out, or you can send him your forks / fork internals and he can ship them back. Jamie Daugherty @ Daugherty Motorsports is my preference if I really want the best solution, and don't want to spend too much, he will build you something that actually addresses your exact needs and he won't cost crazy amounts.

Andreani is way outside of anyone's price range except race teams, but if you had a spare 20K to spend on the best stuff that's where you'd spend it.

Back to you and your problem - you need a revalve. A proper revalve with a new piston and a stack that's designed to match the springs and your riding needs. Off the shelf Ohlins/Penske/Racetech/K Tech might get you closer, but for the same money or less you can get GP Suspension or Daugherty Motorsports and a much better solution.


Good judgement comes from experience, and a lot of that comes from bad judgement.

Last edited by TwentySixRed; 02-25-2016 at 10:37 PM. Reason: adding an image and correcting grammar
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post #20 of 38 (permalink) Old 02-26-2016, 06:45 AM
I eat my R1
 
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Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Toronto Canada
Posts: 704
I've only ran the stock Bridgestones on track but next time I'll be using a Pirelli Supercorsa SC1 Front and SC2 rear and I'm hoping that the tire is softer in construction and that tones down the harshness over ruts and sharp bumps. Tire pressures here can help a lot if you know what works well for your tire of choice. For me a Pirelli feels great around 32-34 hot off warmers for the front. 26-28 R hot.

You can cheat a bit on the street with a bit lower pressures for a softer ride but it will start feeling real shit if you're below a certain point in the front or the rear...

BTW I think the book wants like 36F/42R cold psi which is prob great for tire life riding two up on the interstate...but that's pretty damn harsh over bumps. Give the cold PSI a reduction and see if you find a happier compromise...
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