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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I was reading through the 2015 R1/R1M Technical Update and pulled some interesting/noteworthy information:

Oil
-Yamalube 15W50 Full Synthetic

Engine Hardware
-Aluminum engine cover bolts are not to be reused if removed.

Intake manifold flapper valve to meet noise emissions
-Opens at 7,500 RPM, closes at 7,000 RPM

Electronic Racing Suspension (ERS) on R1M
-Suspension Control Unit adjusts Rebound and Compression
-Preload is manually adjusted. Applies to front fork and rear shock.

Cast magnesium wheels
-Touch up any paint flaws/damage ASAP to prevent oxidation and additional wheel damage.
-Aluminum plate placed between brake disc and wheel to prevent water intrusion and rapid corrosion due to dissimilar metals.
-Gaskets in place on rear wheel sprocket carrier mounting towers to prevent water intrusion and subsequent corrosion. Gaskets must be replaced in sprocket carrier is removed from wheel.
-Separate rear brake disc carrier used. No gaskets – thread locking agent prevents water intrusion.

R1M body
-Dry-carbon fiber used for front fender, upper cowl and side cowl
-Dry-carbon stronger, lighter that wet-carbon, but 3-4 times the cost to produce.

LED headlights
-Not serviceable. Must be replaced if LED fails.
-Lights and control units are easily removable for track-day/racing.

IMU Inertial Measurement Unit
-One-piece unit located under the battery.
-Handle with care – do not drop or subject to strong shocks.
-Do not attempt to clean the IMU with a chemical spray and/or compressed air. May damage breathable membrane.
-Changing the battery to one of a different size (such as lightweight lithium-type) will affect the vibration condition around the battery box, which may cause the IMU to not function properly.

Communications Control Unit (CCU) and GPS Receiver
-Allows rider to capture ride data
-Y-TRAC app for smart devices
-Y-TRAC Data log viewer - analyze and compare logged data.
-Send YRC setting to the bike via Y-TRAC.
-Save YRC settlings for each circuit with tuning/setting notes via Y-TRAC.
-Y-TRAC supports Android 4.2 and newer (available now) and iOS7 and newer (available late Spring 2015). Does not support Windows mobile operating systems.
-Set sampling rates for logging via CCU Config
-AutoLap setting – preload and configure race courses for automatic lap counting and timing via CCU Config
-CCU Kit for standard R1 models: includes hardware kit, seat cowl and pad, CCU mounting brackets, CAN bus cable, GPS receiver, and CCU. Pricing and availability TBA.

Traction Control System
-Adapts based on lean angle – more sensitive the deeper the lean angle.
-System monitors front wheel speed sensor, rear wheel speed sensor, IMU lean angle, and throttle grip opening angle.
-Engine Control Unit (ECU) can manipulate YCC-T throttle control (reduce throttle blade opening), ignition coil control (retard timing) and fuel injector control (reduce injection duration) to mitigate traction loss.

Slide Control System
-System monitors front wheel speed sensor and IMU slide detection.
-ECU manipulates ignition coil control (retard timing) to reduce slide and maximize drive.

Lift Control System (LIF)
-System monitors front wheel speed sensor, rear wheel speed sensors and IMU front pitch up rate.
-ECU can manipulate YCC-T throttle control (close throttle blade), ignition coil control (retard timing) and fuel injector control (reduce injection duration) to reduce front end wheel lift.

OHLINS Electronic Racing Suspension (ERS)
-Manual mode allows for rider to fine tune damping adjustments to suit riding conditions.
-Automatic mode allows for the semi-active suspension to continuously adjust the front and rear suspension damping forces based on brake pressure, vehicle speed, acceleration and lean angle.
-System monitors rear wheel speed sensor, IMU lean angle and acceleration, and front brake pressure sensor.
-Suspension Control Unit (SCU) controls suspension valve actuators to adjust front and rear damping.

Power Delivery Mode (PWR)
-System similar to D-mode throttle system found on 2009-2014 R1.
-Four modes change reaction speed of throttle blade opening with respect to throttle grip position. 4 is slowest reaction, 1 is quickest reaction.

Launch Control System (LCS)
-Once activated, the system monitors front wheel speed sensor, rear wheel speed sensor, throttle grip opening angle, and engine speed.
-ECU controls YCC-T throttle control (close throttle blade), ignition timing control and fuel injector control to regulate engine speed and power output to provide the best start from a standstill.

Quick Shift System (QSS)
-System monitors gear position sensor, rear wheel speed sensor, throttle blade opening angle, shift sensor and engine speed.
-ECU controls ignition timing (retards timing) during up-shifts to reduce engine power and allow for transmission to shift to the next gear.
-System only active when vehicle speed is above 12-MPH, engine speed is above 2,000-RPM and when the vehicle is accelerating.
-System does not function when the clutch lever is pulled.
-Allows use of GP shift pattern – shifter has a second pre-drilled hole for mounting shift linkage. Must 6mm x 1.0 thread pitch tap to finish pre-drilled hole.

Anti-Lock Braking and Unified-Braking System
-System optimizes front and rear brake force distribution.
-Rear brake force is reduced as lean angle increases.
-System monitors front wheel speed sensor, rear wheel speed sensor, IMU lean angle, and front brake pressure sensor.
-ABS electronic control unit controls hydraulic unit to control rear brake force.
-System is not active under 12-MPH
 

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Thanks Miller Yamaha,
This is solid information. Especially this

"-Changing the battery to one of a different size will affect the vibration condition around the battery box, which may cause the IMU to not function properly."

Ehh. What happens to my lithium's?
 

· For no ma'am
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R1M body
-Dry-carbon fiber used for front fender, upper cowl and side cowl
-Dry-carbon stronger, lighter that wet-carbon, but 3-4 times the cost to produce.


I assume this means it's autoclave.

-Changing the battery to one of a different size will affect the vibration condition around the battery box, which may cause the IMU to not function properly.

:(Does this mean lightweight batteries are out?
 

· Live 2 Ride
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The info about the corrosion and oxidation of the wheels, if there is any water intrusion, how careful do you think you need to be? Just be cautious, take the wheel off, and wipe everything down if caught out in the rain?
 

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-Changing the battery to one of a different size will affect the vibration condition around the battery box, which may cause the IMU to not function properly.

:(Does this mean lightweight batteries are out?
take it as a heads up, thats how i read it.. we pad our batteries as it is.. and the LFX19 actually does fit in the same compartment size as the oem, with pads in place i doubt its an issue...

vibrations dont necessarily increase, as they are just lighter and a solid plastic shell... shorai would be fine i'm thinking...

it says nothing of the lightness factor, just the size.. :dunno :yesnod

Thanks for the info!

Not excited about the lightweight battery note
i'll wait to get clarification before i worry about that.. if you're telling me losing 5-7 lbs of a battery that the vibrations will increase, then i guess we cant mod the bikes at all.... only if you ADD weight! :hammer:
 

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I still plan on getting a MOTY Design or SpeedCell battery with quick disconnects. Think Digs hit on the nail with this one; as long as you've got the battery padded so it doesn't bounce around, I think everything will be fine.
 

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-Dry-carbon stronger, lighter that wet-carbon, but 3-4 times the cost to produce.
That got to be a typo (or marketing talk).
Dry carbon (prepreg) isn't necessarily stronger than a well made wet carbon part, if the second is done right (vacuum cure).
For the same reason it isn't necessarily lighter.
And the cost to produce isn't 3-4 times higher either.
Prepreg is easier to work with and for that reason is less time consuming, especially for complex parts. This compensates for the somewhat higher material costs.
Some parts even cannot be done "wet", as the laminate will not stay in place.
They may be referring to the fact that an autoclave is needed and may be comparing with the (unprofessional) "wet layup without vaccum cure" here.

However I would guess that the "3-4 times higher cost" was rather meant "in comparison with the injection-molded standard fairing".
 

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· R1.. The fast kind
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About the IMU and changing of battery..
I'm no expert in the field but i guess there are a lot of vibrations entering the IMU and to work properly they have to filter the data with clever algorithms.
So, changing the propertys of the surroundings of the sensor may change the signature of the signal data(?)
 

· For no ma'am
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That got to be a typo (or marketing talk).
Dry carbon (prepreg) isn't necessarily stronger than a well made wet carbon part, if the second is done right (vacuum cure).
If you're referring to the quality of the carbon and how it is oriented for a particular application then you may have a point, however all things being equal autoclave is much lighter for the same strength as wet layup. There's no way around that fact.
 

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About the IMU and changing of battery..
I'm no expert in the field but i guess there are a lot of vibrations entering the IMU and to work properly they have to filter the data with clever algorithms.
So, changing the propertys of the surroundings of the sensor may change the signature of the signal data(?)
I'd say it absolutely has to filter out noisy accelerometer data. The deal with the battery isn't so much a concern about the battery adding vibration I think. I believe it's due to the reduced mass not being able to dampen vibrations as well. Sounds like the IMU is mounted near the battery. It'll be interesting to see what race teams do.
 

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The info about the corrosion and oxidation of the wheels, if there is any water intrusion, how careful do you think you need to be? Just be cautious, take the wheel off, and wipe everything down if caught out in the rain?
Magnesium wheels are pretty corrosive and bend easily so you have to be extremely careful with them. Hitting big potholes will probably bend them and if you have scratches on the wheels they will oxidize fairly quickly with moisture. So you have to cover the scratches before they get wet. I made the mistake a couple times stripping the paint off magnesium wheels on an RS250 and they corroded under powder coating. If your remove the "pickling" or coating (before paint gets applied) on the wheels they will corrode no question. As much as I love magnesium lightweight wheels you can not abuse them like aluminum alloy. I use to put light coating of grease on the exposed surfaces under the sprocket carriers to keep water from attacking the exposed magnesium which seems to help. As long as the paint on the wheels covers the material water isn't a problem. Just a bit of information for those who have never used these types of wheels.
 

· R1.. The fast kind
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I'd say it absolutely has to filter out noisy accelerometer data. The deal with the battery isn't so much a concern about the battery adding vibration I think. I believe it's due to the reduced mass not being able to dampen vibrations as well. Sounds like the IMU is mounted near the battery. It'll be interesting to see what race teams do.
Yes, thank you for pointing that out, what i meant was the batteries weight will act as a harmonic balancer and any changes will also distort the signal signature from the IMU.

But of course there will come some fix for that :thumbup
 

· My R1 is my M1....
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Great information! However, being an old school kind of guy that I am, I'll stick with my 2009 model and bypass all the new electronic wizardry......way too many possibilities that may require taking ADVIL....and besides, isn't actually controlling the bike, human control, one of the best parts of riding a sport bike? I'm sorry but I, like many others, are not fans of all this modern electronics.....!!? Just one mans opinion!
 
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