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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everyone, seems like a nice forum here :) I'll give a little background information about myself since this is my first post. I'm 20, I'm in college, and I love corvettes!! However, my budget does not allow me to purchase a vette at the moment, but I do have the funds for an R1.

Before anyone jumps down my throat, I have read the sticky about buying an R1 as my first bike. While I see many warnings about how I'm going to kill myself and whatnot, I have several friends who tell me I'll be fine, they say the hardest part is to actually get moving and just be cautious of my actions with the gas and clutch. I don't plan on tracking for awhile, nor do I plan on street racing. I plan on having a nice bike to cruise around on, and maybe have some high speed fun once I get comfortable ;) Please, I don't want to hear anyone harassing my decision for an R1 (like I've seen in other threads), because I don't plan on reaching this bike's max. I'm not going to be fooling around on it, because as my friend said "its all about respect, if you get hoity toity you'll die". He says take off isn't any tougher than on another bike, but just the most messed up part by beginners.

My reasons for getting the R1 is because it looks great, it's quick, and I've only heard good thing about its reliability. I had originally planned on getting an R6, but one of my buddies who races on a track almost every weekend during spring and summer doesn't think they have a reliable transmission on bikes with higher mileage. I'm set on the R1 because I plan on having it for awhile, so please, don't tell me to get another first bike or say "wow, look at this retard ignoring our advice", because I'm not ignoring your advice, I just feel you're being a little too pessimistic and just because other beginners couldn't stay within their ability range certainly doesn't mean others can't.

Ok, now on to my actual topic haha.

1) I'm thinking about purchasing one on ebay, has anyone had troubles doing this in the past, either with the delivery or description of the bike? I do a lot of buying and selling on ebay, but never with a vehicle.

2) What kind of mileage is considered high on these bikes? What is the max mileage I should be willing to bid on?

3) What other online sources of bike listings are recommended? I've seen cycletrader, any others?

4) I plan on getting a 2004 R1, what would you say is a fair price for ones with 5000 miles, 10000 miles, and 20000 miles?

5) Are there any general topics about this bike that might be good to know? If you have any feedback (positive :p) I would appreciate it!

PS, I plan on purchasing in April or May.
 

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The Intern
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Hello everyone, seems like a nice forum here :) I'll give a little background information about myself since this is my first post. I'm 20, I'm in college, and I love corvettes!! However, my budget does not allow me to purchase a vette at the moment, but I do have the funds for an R1.

Before anyone jumps down my throat, I have read the sticky about buying an R1 as my first bike. While I see many warnings about how I'm going to kill myself and whatnot, I have several friends who tell me I'll be fine, they say the hardest part is to actually get moving and just be cautious of my actions with the gas and clutch. I don't plan on tracking for awhile, nor do I plan on street racing. I plan on having a nice bike to cruise around on, and maybe have some high speed fun once I get comfortable ;) Please, I don't want to hear anyone harassing my decision for an R1 (like I've seen in other threads), because I don't plan on reaching this bike's max. I'm not going to be fooling around on it, because as my friend said "its all about respect, if you get hoity toity you'll die". He says take off isn't any tougher than on another bike, but just the most messed up part by beginners.

My reasons for getting the R1 is because it looks great, it's quick, and I've only heard good thing about its reliability. I had originally planned on getting an R6, but one of my buddies who races on a track almost every weekend during spring and summer doesn't think they have a reliable transmission on bikes with higher mileage. I'm set on the R1 because I plan on having it for awhile, so please, don't tell me to get another first bike or say "wow, look at this retard ignoring our advice", because I'm not ignoring your advice, I just feel you're being a little too pessimistic and just because other beginners couldn't stay within their ability range certainly doesn't mean others can't.

Ok, now on to my actual topic haha.

1) I'm thinking about purchasing one on ebay, has anyone had troubles doing this in the past, either with the delivery or description of the bike? I do a lot of buying and selling on ebay, but never with a vehicle.

2) What kind of mileage is considered high on these bikes? What is the max mileage I should be willing to bid on?

3) What other online sources of bike listings are recommended? I've seen cycletrader, any others?

4) I plan on getting a 2004 R1, what would you say is a fair price for ones with 5000 miles, 10000 miles, and 20000 miles?

5) Are there any general topics about this bike that might be good to know? If you have any feedback (positive :p) I would appreciate it!


PS, I plan on purchasing in April or May.

Some of my input:

1) I'm thinking about purchasing one on ebay, has anyone had troubles doing this in the past, either with the delivery or description of the bike? I do a lot of buying and selling on ebay, but never with a vehicle.
A: You can buy on eBay, but if I were you, I would go to see the bike in person. It is easy to say it is perfect and never raced, never abused, but once you are in person and start looking into th e nooks and tight spaces, you would be surprised what that can tell you. Remember, they take pictures that will help them sell the bike, not to disclose all faults with it.
Bottom line, I would get my cash and would go see the bike (pay a friend a couple cases of beer, pay for gas, and use his truck to bring it back...maybe your friend will come with you too - fun trip).


2) What kind of mileage is considered high on these bikes? What is the max mileage I should be willing to bid on?
A: for a 2004 R1, if you see 20K, I would consider that too high, but it is a personal decision (what is high to you may not be to me). Remember, there are many scammers out there, so they may trick you by changing parts to make you think the bike has lower miles...they can buy a used speedo off eBay and replace their 30K speedo, and now the bike has 2K. You would never know unless you see the bike and assess the bike as a whole up close.

3) What other online sources of bike listings are recommended? I've seen cycletrader, any others?
A: cycletrader is ok. Look on local and near craigslists. Will give you a chance to see the bike too. Whatever you do, make them start and ride the bike in front of you, go through all gears (or while on a stand). check oil, fluids (how many times did they change tires...do not ask this question directly...be sneaky).

4) I plan on getting a 2004 R1, what would you say is a fair price for ones with 5000 miles, 10000 miles, and 20000 miles?
A: If you wait till end of December, and buy from a northern location, you should be able to get one for about: 5Kmiles-7K, 10Kmiles-6K, 20Kmiles-I wouldnt buy, but about 5500 or less.

5) Are there any general topics about this bike that might be good to know? If you have any feedback (positive :p) I would appreciate it!

For new, stay with stock gearing (sprockets). If not stock, change them to stock. Practice, practice and practice. Go to a lot and do fig eights until you get tired.
Start riding on empty roads. Gradually, as your confidence grows, expand your roads slowly to get a better feel for them. Do not ride in traffic. If you stall, do not rush. Take extra time, even if morons behind honk. Rushing is what will make you wish you bought a 250cc bike.
Get good gear (not just helmet, but good jacket, BOOTS, GLOVES, kevlar jeans wouldnt be bad).
Remember, this bad boy can get you past 100mph in first, so try to respect it, or you will find yourself on your ass, and your bike on you.
Start slowly until you get the hang of it. Take MSF class (do not take your bike to it though).
Good luck.



PS, I plan on purchasing in April or May
A: good luck then. High demand on bikes then. Prices will be higher by at least 1K. Buy in winter.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for your input, a lot of helpful information! How much would a full set of good gear cost? If size makes a difference in price, I'm about 5'9 and 210 lbs.
 

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Have you killed a cat today ?
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Some of my input:

1) I'm thinking about purchasing one on ebay, has anyone had troubles doing this in the past, either with the delivery or description of the bike? I do a lot of buying and selling on ebay, but never with a vehicle.
A: You can buy on eBay, but if I were you, I would go to see the bike in person. It is easy to say it is perfect and never raced, never abused, but once you are in person and start looking into th e nooks and tight spaces, you would be surprised what that can tell you. Remember, they take pictures that will help them sell the bike, not to disclose all faults with it.
Bottom line, I would get my cash and would go see the bike (pay a friend a couple cases of beer, pay for gas, and use his truck to bring it back...maybe your friend will come with you too - fun trip).


2) What kind of mileage is considered high on these bikes? What is the max mileage I should be willing to bid on?
A: for a 2004 R1, if you see 20K, I would consider that too high, but it is a personal decision (what is high to you may not be to me). Remember, there are many scammers out there, so they may trick you by changing parts to make you think the bike has lower miles...they can buy a used speedo off eBay and replace their 30K speedo, and now the bike has 2K. You would never know unless you see the bike and assess the bike as a whole up close.

3) What other online sources of bike listings are recommended? I've seen cycletrader, any others?
A: cycletrader is ok. Look on local and near craigslists. Will give you a chance to see the bike too. Whatever you do, make them start and ride the bike in front of you, go through all gears (or while on a stand). check oil, fluids (how many times did they change tires...do not ask this question directly...be sneaky).

4) I plan on getting a 2004 R1, what would you say is a fair price for ones with 5000 miles, 10000 miles, and 20000 miles?
A: If you wait till end of December, and buy from a northern location, you should be able to get one for about: 5Kmiles-7K, 10Kmiles-6K, 20Kmiles-I wouldnt buy, but about 5500 or less.

5) Are there any general topics about this bike that might be good to know? If you have any feedback (positive :p) I would appreciate it!

For new, stay with stock gearing (sprockets). If not stock, change them to stock. Practice, practice and practice. Go to a lot and do fig eights until you get tired.
Start riding on empty roads. Gradually, as your confidence grows, expand your roads slowly to get a better feel for them. Do not ride in traffic. If you stall, do not rush. Take extra time, even if morons behind honk. Rushing is what will make you wish you bought a 250cc bike.
Get good gear (not just helmet, but good jacket, BOOTS, GLOVES, kevlar jeans wouldnt be bad).
Remember, this bad boy can get you past 100mph in first, so try to respect it, or you will find yourself on your ass, and your bike on you.
Start slowly until you get the hang of it. Take MSF class (do not take your bike to it though).
Good luck.



PS, I plan on purchasing in April or May
A: good luck then. High demand on bikes then. Prices will be higher by at least 1K. Buy in winter.
:iamwithst

:thumbup Good post and for being kind with the newbie.

I agree, he gave you the right advice. All I can say is Respect the Beast and that throttle (not gas) can be your best friend or your worst enemy.

Welcome to the Forum, there is a world of knowledge and riders / racers here. Learn as much as you can :fork

:rock Oh beware of the Gay men on the site, they like the newbies :sneaky

Oh by the way, my name is Pierre and I'm a :boobies 'oholic

:corn
 

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dumdedum
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Before you get the bike read a few books, like Twist of the wrist volume 2 by Keith Code, or Sport riding techniques by Nick Ienatsch. Will give you a bit of education on riding fast bikes, and some important "DO NOT DO" things which will seem odd at first.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for that tip, I'll go pick those up!

Will practicing take offs on my dad's Honda Gold Wing transfer over to the R1? I'm talking about the slowest take off possible without killing the engine.
 

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dumdedum
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Hmm, not really. Not because of the difference in bike's but because every bike has different clutch/throttle Characteristics. However as much riding experience as you can get before you get on the 1 for the first time will help. Don't take this the wrong way... but have you sat on the R1 yet?
 

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Lol, as you know if you do get one just respect it and you'll be fine. Personally im one of those guys that say's get whatever makes you happy, not what people tell you to get. As mentioned I would personaly look at getting one local, or even look here on the forum that someone could possibly look at for you.

Lol, nice choice on car's too, we love our Vette's :)
 

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dumdedum
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Yeah go and sit on one. Pretend your gonna buy it off him, he may let you play on it abit. I remember the first time i sat on one, i was like 'fu*king hell, this is a serious bit of kit', kinda made me realise that the R1 is a lot lot lot lot more than just a stunningly beautiful bike. The other problem with the R1 is: It is really easy to ride it...fast, but one mistake and that's it, it's all over!!
I'm honestly not trying to put you off, i'm kinda of the opinion that you should get what you love. But you need to be aware of what you are getting, before you get it. Also without reading and understanding the two books i mentioned before, you will have problems with the R1. When you get it, spend a day or so in a car park or something learning how the bike turns in and reacts to input. This is something you should do on any first bike, in my opinion.
 

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Have you killed a cat today ?
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:corn

Yes I think it's good to feel the beast first so find one and mount her.

Like the man said every bike has different feel, even exact models. So as soon as you bought it. Feel where the clutch "catches" and then add a bit of throttle. The R1 you will be able to move forward from idle on a flat surface by just slowly letting the clutch go. Then you can start adding some throttle (this will program your brain) and it will become reflex ...

Find a parking lot, practice basic pull aways and stops until you get the feel (you'll know when) do left turns and right turns from a stop (slow sharp turns are difficult at first) Lightly trail brake with your rear to stabilise if needed.

Do the same, slow left or right at motion. These two basic exercises will quickly familiarize your brain with the bike.

Do teardrops (start at one point make a wide turn and end up on the same spot in the opposite direction. Do it in both directions. Do figure of eights also in both directions.

Do as many emergency stops as you can, start slow - you will quickly respect that front brake and this will prevent you from just grabbing it when those dreaded days come ... and they do.

Practice makes perfect, these are the basics. I still do it if I get on a new bike or if I had not ridden in a while. I saved my ass many a time.

Relax your arms, the R1 is not happy with stiff arms (you'll notice it when you get wanker cramps, squeeze the tank with your legs. Oh yes, the R's are hot under the seat and on the legs, it's normal.

I call mine the "nutcrackster" that you can figure out for yourself :hammer:

:fork Ride Safe & Respect the Beast :rock

... and that throttle :secret:
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 · (Edited)
Thanks for the info :) I really appreciate all the help I can get! Practicing the emergency braking like you suggested is a great tip, I never would have thought of that. Let's just hope I don't flip it and cause an emergency, how ironic would that be :p I see you call yours the nutcrackster, does that mean it's uncomfortable there, or you just know if something hit you from above it would cause some pain?

Does anyone have general traffic tips? I pretty much get cut off daily in my car, so what is it like on a bike and how should I react to this situation? Also it should be good to know in case this happens, but if my bike did come out from under me, are there any techniques to only take the least amount of damage? I ask this because my step dad was a responsible driver and crashed on his bike back in college, and my dad crashed on his in college too when he hit some sand taking a turn.

I'm in Ames right now at Iowa State, but I'm from Des Moines.
 

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Have you killed a cat today ?
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Thanks for the info :) I really appreciate all the help I can get! Practicing the emergency braking like you suggested is a great tip, I never would have thought of that. Let's just hope I don't flip it and cause an emergency, how ironic would that be :p I see you call yours the nutcrackster, does that mean it's uncomfortable there, or you just know if something hit you from above it would cause some pain?

Does anyone have general traffic tips? I pretty much get cut off daily in my car, so what is it like on a bike and how should I react to this situation? Also it should be good to know in case this happens, but if my bike did come out from under me, are there any techniques to only take the least amount of damage? I ask this because my step dad was a responsible driver and crashed on his bike back in college, and my dad crashed on his in college too when he hit some sand taking a turn.

I'm in Ames right now at Iowa State, but I'm from Des Moines.

:thumbup

It's a pleasure, emergency braking is what saves your arse, practice it.

Yes the R1 is hard on the nuts, when you brake hard, put the nose down, or even when braking with the engine especially on the 07 I :lhumper: the tank, especially with a pillion on the back (she can kiss 'em better) but you get use to it. Just try to give yourself an inch.

Traffic tips ... hmmm there is many. Stick to the basics, ride as if you are invisible and that no one can see you. In busy areas use the SIDPE principal.

Search - look for potential problems (scan the road ahead from surface, to trees, cars, pedestrians oh and DO NOT forget abut animals !

Identify - Which is priority, the old lady with the poodle or the pothole or tree in the road ?

Predict - predict what may / can / will happen. That car IS going to turn right in front of me.

Decide - What are you going to do about it, brakem, countersteer or avoid.

Execute - Then you do it ( al of these should happen in an instant and will and should become instinct.

If you see a ball rolling in the road, you will brake cause a child will follow. This is the SIDPE principal.

Town or city driving you need to apply this all the time. Cover your brakes, two fingers on the front and / or foot on the brake. Then if something happens it will prevent you from grabbing it and it will give you that 0,1 sec increased response time.

Target fixation !!! Do not look at the pothole because you will hit it. See it and look past it. Great words in riding "look where you want to go" and that includes a car, a turn , a tree whatever ... look for the out, look for the escape.

How to crash ? Read up on low siding and high siding. In short low siding is when your front wheel slips, you fall to the same side that you are leaning to, a short fall. High side the bike throws you because of many reasons i.e. when your in a turn, you loose your rear for a moment, you pannic, leave the throttle and the you die.

If I have to choose, I'll take a low and get as far away from the bikes as possible. There are endless tips out there. Get twist of the grip I / II. It takes time, be confident but never over confident and respect the machine.

:fork Ride Safe :fork
 

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Have you killed a cat today ?
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:thumbup

It's a pleasure, there are too many mistakes to make ourselves so we have to learn from each others that is why we are here. If anyone on the forum :bash you, it's because this is our passion, we all lost friends and we try to look out for each other.

Search the site for some tips and read "the pace" thread. Way to much info to post in one day.

Start with the basics, take it slow day by day and never get over confident. Even Rossi Crashes. The R1 is a forgiving bike, but when you loose her she makes up for all those "forgiven sins"

It stil :scared the :flush: out of me sometimes :fork

:boobies


:jump Life starts at 10 000 rpm :rock
 

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The Intern
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Thanks for your input, a lot of helpful information! How much would a full set of good gear cost? If size makes a difference in price, I'm about 5'9 and 210 lbs.
If there was anything I would not skimp on it would be gear.
Get yourself some riding boots. No, don't listen to your buddies who say just get a boot at walmart. You will only get one chance to use the gear. In that one time, the difference can mean skin grafts and broken bones, or healthy foot.

So, if I had to take a stab at pricing, it would be like this:

- helmet - you can go as cheap as 200, and as much as 1000
- jacket - should have good protection (elbows, shoulders, back), prefer to be integrated rather than removable ...won't shift if you hit the ground.
Looking at about at least 200...look hard in many places, there are deals out there, but you have to be patient.
- gloves - same here, should have lots of protection for that pinkie, knuckles and other fingers, as well as the palm. Thick tough leather. I would say at least 70.
- pants - you are talking your ass here, so dont cheap out either. Again, tough leather that wont disintegrate on impact. IF you get jeans, get at least some kevlar reinforced ones. Leather at least 200, kevlar jeans under 100.

- boots - look for ankle and heel protection, shift lever pad and good sole. should be comfortable. I would say 120 and up.
- eye glasses - I prefer them over tinted visor. Once the sun goes down and you have a tinted visor, guess who cannot see as well?
So I just have a set of riding glasses to take off once the sun sets. about 25 and up.

Biking is not a cheap thing to get into, but once you have some good stuff, you can keep it for a long time. And the first time you go down you will thank the Lord that you chose the gear.
I know there are two extremes here , geared up like a power ranger to go to work, or riding into the mountains with flip flops and tank top shirt.
Use your head. Gear is like seat belts and airbag for cars...dont notice its importance until the crash, but if you crash on a bike, you can really get hurt. You dont want to be one of those who drool all over yourself all the time.

Take care, and be real careful. Practicing on the goldwing will only give you a chance to familiarize with the goldwing.
I would put some slack into the throttle cable of the R1 you get, like less than 4mm. If you have zero slack, any twitch on the wrist will get translated into accel/decel. That could mean a disaster.

Some said book. I read the twist of the wrist and the Sport riding techniques, and think that the Sport Riding Techniques is a better book for you. About 25 at a local book store. Less online used.
 
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