Yamaha R1 Forum: YZF-R1 Forums banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
O Rly? O.O
Joined
·
822 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hey everybody!

Let me preface this post by saying, crack jokes if you want but I'm out enjoying the same sport as everyone in here. :riding

I have owned several R1's over the years (currently own a 2015 r1) and I have never tinkered with one to the point of doing suspension or even setting the stock suspension up.
I am a heavy guy (300 lbs. with gear) and I have reached the point where I want to learn about suspension and how to set it up to accompany my weight as much as possible.

Clearly the stock suspension is not ideal for a rider of my size. I know and completely understand this.
I have submitted an inquiry with the Ohlins distributor in NC to see what they suggest. Whether it be replacing the factory spring or replacing the entire shock ect.


What I need to know now is this, until I replace the stock suspension would it be beneficial to "max out" the stock suspension in regards to rebound, ect.? Would it make the bike feel more "planted" "stable" in corners?
 

·
O Rly? O.O
Joined
·
822 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
In my naive mind I assume a closer setup, wrong spring is better than a wrong setup, wrong spring. If that makes any sense
 

·
Just happy to be here...
Joined
·
1,749 Posts
I think rider sag is the first thing you need to check, cause if you "max" out your preload thats no good lol. If you get the proper springs to set up your SAG correctly not necessarily the springs for your weight, than if your just street riding it will be completely safe because the prelaod is holding most of the weight and allowing the suspension to do its job.
 

·
O Rly? O.O
Joined
·
822 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
I just received a response from Ohlins and rightfully so they stated that even if I replaced the spring to one better suited for my weight the stock suspension components would not hold up to the extra pressure being applied.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
777 Posts
Your bike stock should be able to handle you weight. Think about all the people who carry a passenger on bike with them. Together that is typically 300 plus lbs. My 2000 R1 has max weight capacity of 443 lbs.

I agree with Banky about setting up your sag. Just get a friend, some tools, tape measure,calculator and cable ties and check it out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
777 Posts
Hey everybody!


I am a heavy guy (300 lbs. with gear)
Funny - now you have me wondering how much my gear weighs! I am going to throw my helmet, boots, leathers, gloves, spine protector into a bag and see how much all that crap weighs! :surprise:

:scoots::scoots: waiting for a superbike gif....
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
24,193 Posts
I just received a response from Ohlins and rightfully so they stated that even if I replaced the spring to one better suited for my weight the stock suspension components would not hold up to the extra pressure being applied.
Hi! I've done a few setups for bigger folks (hell, I'm a bigger folk). Short answer: Ohlins personnel who contacted you gave you correct information.

When you look at suspension setup, you start with sag as its been mentioned here. It's the starting point and establishes your travel range and geometry. Basic sag is generally around 1/3 of the total travel, so typically 30-35 mm. The springs on your bike probably won't make that range.

So we need springs most likely (never hurts to check).

The springs oscillations are kept in check by the damping (compression and to a greater degree, rebound). Taking a spring the is substantially stiffer or less stiff into damping that was intended to control a different spring may not be optimal, or sometimes even functional.

So we likely also need damping adjustment (valving). Again, it never hurts to make adjustments to see what you are starting with.

The stuff that was purchased for OEM use generally don't have all the typical features that several of the after market folks offer (ride height, hi/low speed damping, ease of adjustment etc).

Now the reason I point this last aspect out, is because you can re-spring and re-valve to get optimal or at least better performance. And you can do that for much less than replacement components. But, for the extra coin you would get that and any additional features that the aftermarket provider offers.

So, the left and right lateral limits are do absolutely nothing, or replace the fork and shock with aftermarket offerings. You have to choose between those two points what would be best for your intended use.

For what it's worth, many can match the basic performance of the aftermarket with springs and valves. And in some cases the features can be provisioned. But you can't argue the aesthetics of many of the aftermarket.

Hope this helps in some way.
 

·
O Rly? O.O
Joined
·
822 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Hi! I've done a few setups for bigger folks (hell, I'm a bigger folk). Short answer: Ohlins personnel who contacted you gave you correct information.

When you look at suspension setup, you start with sag as its been mentioned here. It's the starting point and establishes your travel range and geometry. Basic sag is generally around 1/3 of the total travel, so typically 30-35 mm. The springs on your bike probably won't make that range.

So we need springs most likely (never hurts to check).

The springs oscillations are kept in check by the damping (compression and to a greater degree, rebound). Taking a spring the is substantially stiffer or less stiff into damping that was intended to control a different spring may not be optimal, or sometimes even functional.

So we likely also need damping adjustment (valving). Again, it never hurts to make adjustments to see what you are starting with.

The stuff that was purchased for OEM use generally don't have all the typical features that several of the after market folks offer (ride height, hi/low speed damping, ease of adjustment etc).

Now the reason I point this last aspect out, is because you can re-spring and re-valve to get optimal or at least better performance. And you can do that for much less than replacement components. But, for the extra coin you would get that and any additional features that the aftermarket provider offers.

So, the left and right lateral limits are do absolutely nothing, or replace the fork and shock with aftermarket offerings. You have to choose between those two points what would be best for your intended use.

For what it's worth, many can match the basic performance of the aftermarket with springs and valves. And in some cases the features can be provisioned. But you can't argue the aesthetics of many of the aftermarket.

Hope this helps in some way.

Dan, Thanks for the response! I've known you as the "Goto" suspension guy on here and I was hoping you would respond.

I've always ridden on stock suspension with factory settings therefore i'm used to the way it rides. In my opinion the bike doesn't feel unstable ect. ect. but knowing that it is so out of wack because of my weight makes me wonder what it's supposed to feel like once it's set up.

Dan as you mentioned my bike reaching the desired sag with the stock spring is extremely unlikely (Which I assumed).
If I kept all of the OEM hardware would it be beneficial to adjust sag as close as possible to the desired? Or just leave it be until I am ready to replace to a more suitable aftermarket unit (since i'm used to it)?


Thanks everybody for all of the responses!
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
24,193 Posts
Dan, Thanks for the response! I've known you as the "Goto" suspension guy on here and I was hoping you would respond.

I've always ridden on stock suspension with factory settings therefore i'm used to the way it rides. In my opinion the bike doesn't feel unstable ect. ect. but knowing that it is so out of wack because of my weight makes me wonder what it's supposed to feel like once it's set up.

Dan as you mentioned my bike reaching the desired sag with the stock spring is extremely unlikely (Which I assumed).
If I kept all of the OEM hardware would it be beneficial to adjust sag as close as possible to the desired? Or just leave it be until I am ready to replace to a more suitable aftermarket unit (since i'm used to it)?


Thanks everybody for all of the responses!
Been more of a "gun guy" lately, but I still do very limited suspension stuff :lol

I always recommend starting with sag. If you can't get to the number you need, get as close as you can. While it's not optimal to max any setting, realistically if the component is wrong and it gets you close; go for it. Get it to a measurable starting point and judge from there. Typically most sportbikes like to sit high in the travel for best handling, but you won't know if you need to be higher or lower unless you measure. I set my R1 at 38mm (street or track), but my R6 will want to fall on its face and tuck the front if I'm lower than 33mm (track only and I run a 190/55 rear tire).

If you can't make sag, you'll need stiffer springs (most likely), and you can gauge whether you will need valving. But I've noticed that when making small changes (.90kg/mm to .95 or even 1.0kg/mm) you may be able to go without valving. It may wear your tires out poorly (see "Show us your chicken strips" thread), but it will handle better than if you had not done springs.

So, long winded story made short; yes, set the sag and dampers as well as you can get them with the components you have. If you determine you need more for your liking, start with springs.
 

·
O Rly? O.O
Joined
·
822 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Been more of a "gun guy" lately, but I still do very limited suspension stuff :lol

I always recommend starting with sag. If you can't get to the number you need, get as close as you can. While it's not optimal to max any setting, realistically if the component is wrong and it gets you close; go for it. Get it to a measurable starting point and judge from there. Typically most sportbikes like to sit high in the travel for best handling, but you won't know if you need to be higher or lower unless you measure. I set my R1 at 38mm (street or track), but my R6 will want to fall on its face and tuck the front if I'm lower than 33mm (track only and I run a 190/55 rear tire).

If you can't make sag, you'll need stiffer springs (most likely), and you can gauge whether you will need valving. But I've noticed that when making small changes (.90kg/mm to .95 or even 1.0kg/mm) you may be able to go without valving. It may wear your tires out poorly (see "Show us your chicken strips" thread), but it will handle better than if you had not done springs.

So, long winded story made short; yes, set the sag and dampers as well as you can get them with the components you have. If you determine you need more for your liking, start with springs.
Thank you sir!
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top