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after riding for a decent amount of time and letting your tires warm up, how safe is it to take hard turns in the cold? do the sides of the tire warm up as you ride to? i have donlops (cant wait to get rid of them), so when i'm riding in the cold now, im really cautious around any kinda turn. course i know its obvioulsy not safe to be draggin knees in 40- 50 degree weather, but about how far is safe?
 

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Bone Stock....for now....
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Just think of having/keeping the largest contact patch as possible meaning less lean/slower speeds at those temps. I've had a couple MINOR rear end slides at temps in the 40's and upper 30's (Dunlop 218's). Again, just slow it down and have fun. When it isn't fun anymore time to put her up for the winter. IMO the tires mentioned above never do reach their optimal operating temp all based only on my experience when riding in colder temps. Just need to feel them out as mentioned in previous posts is my opinion.

Ride safe....:thumbup

EDIT: You know those very early mornings when it's slightly above freezing but there's frost on the car windows....it's on the street too so leave her parked for sure if that's the case. Just thought of a ride I had.....:2bitchsla ...lol
 

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My gixxer eats you!
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We have had a few nice days to ride, and I just cant bring myself to get down in the turns with the colder weather. Like everyone else said, its better to mod the bike over winter rather than fix it.
 

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LIFE IS SHORT
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hang a butt cheek off, weight the outside peg, & kiss the mirror like a monkey - this will give you plenty of spare lean angle...

the squidiots will laugh at your chicken strips, but you'll laugh at they're rashed bike
 

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I SeE ClOwNS
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pardon my ignorance, but last few rides that i went on i did a small burnout as i leave my house just to keep teh tire sticky it prolly last about 2 min in 50 degree weather but still. i alwasy try to lock my rear at liek 5-10 mph and see how baddly it slides gives me a n indication of how "safe" it is


I get a bit nervouse ridding in cold weather i evendelayed byuing leathers and will wait for spring to resume riding. am i being a puss or am going right about this
 

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Ultra12 said:
pardon my ignorance, but last few rides that i went on i did a small burnout as i leave my house just to keep teh tire sticky it prolly last about 2 min in 50 degree weather but still. i alwasy try to lock my rear at liek 5-10 mph and see how baddly it slides gives me a n indication of how "safe" it is


I get a bit nervouse ridding in cold weather i evendelayed byuing leathers and will wait for spring to resume riding. am i being a puss or am going right about this
If it isn't fun then it's time to put her up for the winter.....that would be the best option. Break out the Isle of Man dvd's, Faster, 2005 and previous Motogp season downloads...lol....and have a great winter......do some minor or major mods it's all good.:)
 

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GAMBLER said:
hang a butt cheek off, weight the outside peg, & kiss the mirror like a monkey - this will give you plenty of spare lean angle...

the squidiots will laugh at your chicken strips, but you'll laugh at they're rashed bike

:iamwithst
 

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Action figure sold separately
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Poe said:
Just think of having/keeping the largest contact patch as possible
Not necessarily. On some tires, the largest contact patch is associated with greater degrees of lean angle, not less. The key in extremely cold/slick riding conditions is to keep the contact patch beneath the CoM as much as possible, and not move the contact patch out from under the CoM beyond the limited amount of traction generated. I agree with the rest of your post, though, it is a matter of feel/experience/judgement.
 

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Eyespy said:
Not necessarily. On some tires, the largest contact patch is associated with greater degrees of lean angle, not less. The key in extremely cold/slick riding conditions is to keep the contact patch beneath the CoM as much as possible, and not move the contact patch out from under the CoM beyond the limited amount of traction generated. I agree with the rest of your post, though, it is a matter of feel/experience/judgement.
Thanks Eyespy, ALWAYS appreciative of your knowledge/ insights on the sport and art of the ride.:)
 

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flipper
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Eyespy said:
Not necessarily. On some tires, the largest contact patch is associated with greater degrees of lean angle, not less. The key in extremely cold/slick riding conditions is to keep the contact patch beneath the CoM as much as possible, and not move the contact patch out from under the CoM beyond the limited amount of traction generated. I agree with the rest of your post, though, it is a matter of feel/experience/judgement.
Hey Eyespy I'm sure that what you said makes sense but being a candidate for the lead role in the next dumb and dumberer movie I have to admit that I am a little confused here.

Are you saying hang of less and lean the bike more?
Also another question for you in cold weather I normally put my tyre pressures up by a psi or so. I see that you ride in So Cal which is a very similar climate and road conditions to here in the South of France where I ride and so I assume that you also ride the canyons all year round. :thumbup
 

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Redrocket996 said:


Are you saying hang of less and lean the bike more?
No, I'm not.

"the key in extremely cold/slick riding conditions is to keep the contact patch beneath the CoM as much as possible, and not move the contact patch out from under the CoM beyond the limited amount of traction generated."
 

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flipper
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Eyespy said:
No, I'm not.
Thanks for clearing that up then Eyespy :lol :lol

I really hate the colder temperatures but do enjoy having less cars on the road as the roads here are a lot more empty in the winter. I was out today and was much slower than I normally am but with the roads being so slippy in places and having saved a front end slide the last time I was out on that road I took it pretty easy. Winter really sucks:yesnod
 

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Redrocket996 said:
Thanks for clearing that up then Eyespy :lol :lol

I really hate the colder temperatures but do enjoy having less cars on the road as the roads here are a lot more empty in the winter. I was out today and was much slower than I normally am but with the roads being so slippy in places and having saved a front end slide the last time I was out on that road I took it pretty easy. Winter really sucks:yesnod
Regarding the other question, adjusting cold psi for cold temps. You wrote that for cold weather riding you increase the cold psi. This is exactly opposite of what you should do. When it is very cold, you want to decrease cold tire psi inflation pressures. You mentioned that you saved a front end slide. I am glad you saved it. Lower the cold psi, and ride with moderation in cold temps and you'll be less likely to have front slides. Also, as I am sure you are aware, you save a front end slide with a little more throttle to transfer the excess load off the front tire.
 
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