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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys buttoning up my case together and noticed the torque specs for the 09, it’s 22ftlbs in sequence, and than loosen each one individually, retorqued to 13ftlbs and than 60 degrees. I’m assuming these are torque to yield since I didn’t get a confident feel after the 60 degrees, can anyone confirm before I purchase new ones, and recommendations on where to buy them besides m*s**.com for 9$ each lol
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Lots of racing old bikes and hardly see case bolts being swapped for new. I'd just run the numbers in 1/3rds. In other words 6 is the torque so I'd run all the numbers down to 2 ft, then go back to the same number and now 4 is the torque. 6 is the final torque.

+60° ??? and you don't like the threads being torn out... I agree. What could go wrong but a leak? If you check torque spec on bolt sizes, all are within that range. So I'd forgo the 60 and use the final toque of 22ft.

Note that only 1 thru 10 require the yield. And when it says 22ft initial torque, I'd stop there and move on with the other 30. Then to verify, look at the book page with torque ranges for the M9 bolt size. Past 22ft, I mean way past, then maybe add the 60.

Yeah it's a lot of bolts, but a case is a case is an insert.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Well they won’t leak, worst case is the bolts aren’t evenly stretched and some are tighter than the others after the set 60* I loosen after the 22, and go up to 13, and than 60*, they don’t really feel that snug, they tighten up but can definately go more with light to moderate pressure, why i was asking if they were stretch bolts. And they are the most important since they are basically the caps, and where the case will be taking the most downward load, (lol), do you feel 22 ft lbs is sufficient for those 10? Like I have plenty more to go before I feel that tight snug resistance where they bottom out. Assuming the 60* is for the stretch.

and it says right there “new” figuring they are stretch and one time use

Does anyone just torque them to a set amount and be done with it? And do you reuse them with no issues?
There’s book and than there’s real world lol but if I have to spend 100$ for 10 bolts, it’s worth the peace of mind the crank will be evenly tightened
 

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20ft M8 and 35ft for M10. Didn't catch them using 9's on the crank inserts, but they use M10's and that's a full tq at 35 on the crankcase for the crank. I ride a different bike and the shop manual is talking about big end rod stretch bolts and that's 120° +/- 5°. Then you take a C-mic and from head to end of bolt, measure the stretch. They give you a stretch window and if you breakout of that, then new bolts. But the cases show no initial plus 60 degrees, just a straight torque for set the M's diameters and the pattern for torque sequence. .

Now if you are saying there is a lot more give to go as you feel sneaking up on it, then I'd follow book and you're safe as per book. I'm more an R&D kind of chance taker. So I doubt if using the right tools, follow book spec, you can't tear the threads out but the one you set with the 60 degree move to find out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Kinda hard to understand what you are saying, and I mean that with no negative intent, pretty sure the first pass of 22 is to seat everything snug inktially, than loosen the stress once it’s seated, than to 13 to make them all even torque, and than 60* to have equal
Amount of stretch and clamping across them. I wanna say they are just too stretched apart already and that 60* on already used bolts which doesn’t have the same clamping pressure as used. Which is exactly the definition of why they are TTY bolts lol, just gonna buy the new ones so I have no second guesses, just wanted some input of how common it is to do so before purchasing.
 

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I'd do this.. how many are longer than the others? Are they all over the place or pretty much close enough is the average? Then I'd buy a round if 3 or more are out of spec. They show a breakout length and then replace in some caution box?

I hear yeah, and you should go by the book. Here is why. Nephew has a HD. Torqued the one cylinder with the initial torque plus 90°. Blew out the base gasket so many miles later. His buddy says set this torque and you're done. Blew the base gasket out a lot sooner. This time I ran a touch of GM intake manifold sealer around the return hole it seems to pop out from. Torqued by the book and the plus degrees again... haven't seen him since for that leak. Thousand mile trip, back and forth to work on some days. Has to be that proper degree on the head torque.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Yeah they’re all ordered, I won’t be able to ride comfortably knowing they are a possibility of failure. All for one bad second gear lol, gaskets, cleaning, oil and filter x2, waiting on parts, hours and hours. Don’t want to have to do it again over cheaping out on the most important bolts of the engine lol.

Conclusion, replace the 10 bolts every time that are TTY, thank you for the input and responses.
 

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No prob. Schooling myself on this bike. So say you missed a lot of shifts, yes? I'm just curious how bulletproof this bike is out in the field. Trans has not changed since then... without looking up parts... year scaring me, Larry! And parts is a two day turnover for at least 2 of the big4 I've been working on. We talking weeks and weeks?

Ah, I don't buy break and wait bikes... if you get my drift.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Used engine with 9k damage was already done, I just got the ass end of it all lol
it’s just the meticulous time cleaning and prepping, if you have everything you need maybe 2-3 days, but my own bike is my leisure and passion as well, garage time the end of the day is best to zone out lol

 

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Correct me if I'm wrong, but am I reading 3 rods here?


And since we have the gears changed, did we check the drum channel and those high spots in the snake of that channel? Tips, or the peak points get torn up is your generic drum. All 3 forks changed? And the circlips; kind of see the flat side and the round side of the clip? Pull one off and it should lay flat. Too wide and it spins in the groove. Wrinkles up, yeah you could bend to fatten, but the cut side is to the thrust side, right? Where the round side pops over the groove. Flat side is flat in the groove once the thrust sends the load, and that's flat to flat>>> no way to walk up and out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I removed one for weight reduction…. Jk lol it’s hidden to the left, that’s where the clutch basket meshes to the crank 😜 and yeah of course, you see a lot of nicked and worn shift drums, usually my first suspect when trans issues arise. I install my clutch steels rounded edges away from the engine and flats towards, probably not even noticeable but for my hand assuming it’s less ease and let the clutch springs do the work when release, for circlips the same way, more surface contact area, flat side against where the thrust is against by a hair but that’s the unwritten correct way to install
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The clutch plate deal is all about memory. Flats facing you with both frictions and steels. Hands together like you are praying you never miss 2nd with this 3-cyl...wink wink. Now press the fingers together. Hand over the other hand, now all fingers fold the same way is not to fight memory. Thus all in one direction is how I figured out all this cut edging so it makes sense to me.
 
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