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· I am craving sushi.
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Steve Brubaker, the distributor for Dunlop Tires on the East Coast has this write up on it......Very Interesting


> First thing I must mention that I work exclusively with Dunlop product and can only speak about product that I have first hand knowledge and experience with.


> SAFETY. There is not a safety issue in running DOT racing tires on the street. By SAFETY, I mean the tire will not have a failure or come apart from normal aggressive street use. Excluding road hazard. (Falling down on oil, gravel or excessive throttle is not a tire failure)

> DIFFERENCE: The biggest difference in the racing tire and the street tire is in the construction. Street tires have JLB construction and race tires have a Cut Breaker or Cut Belt construction. JLB is when the main tread belt (the ply just underneath the tread rubber) has all of it plies running in the same direction. All the fibres are in the same direction, pointing the way the tire rotates. Cut Breaker construction is when there is 2 belts, both have the plies running at an angle to the rotation.

Take one hand and hold it in front of you, point your finger to the ceiling and keep you fingers side by side. This is what direction the fibres run on a JLB breaker. Now take both hands with the fingers side by side, lay one set of fingers on top of the other set at a 45 degree angle. This is what a Cut Breaker looks like. (a picture is worth 1000 words, wish I had a picture to describe it better).

Whether you understanding the direction of the plies or not, the basic difference in feel and performance is that the JLB construction is very good for stability over bumps and feedback on odd surfaces. It also give a much more smooth ride. This is better for a street ride and over the things that one runs over when riding in street conditions. The Cut Breaker is better at overall side grip. The basic word here is SIDE GRIP. Cut Breakers give much more side grip and a bit of a stiffer ride.

> TEMPERATURES: What does tire temperature have to do with performance? Lets first understand an old falsehood "Race tires won't stick till you warm them up" this is untrue and is a falsehood. Here are the facts. If you took a race tire and a street tire and ran them side by side, the race tire would provide more grip than the street tire in every temperature range. So if both tires are at 60F the race tire works better. If both at 160F, the race tire still works better. Now will a cold race tire work as well as a hot street tire? I don't know, it would depend upon the tires. (But I am sure that someone did this and fell down, then started the rumor. ) The big difference comes in the cold verses hot performance. A race tire get much better when hot. A street tire gets a little bit better when hot.

WARM UP TIME: Dunlops generally come in, in 1 lap (the warm up lap). A street tire gets a little bit better when hot, but not as much as a race tire. The harder one rides the quicker and hotter the tire gets. These are basic datums. The rider has to gain experience with tires and how they work by riding on them many times. There are not hard numbers to describe degrees of traction for every increase in temperature. Experience is the key here.

> Why would you use a RACE TIRE for the STREET? Plus points - More grip. Minus points - Harsher over bumps, less feedback, cost more, tend to wear quicker.

> Why would you use a STREET TIRE for the STREET? Plus points - sufficient grip, smooth ride, more stable over bumps, last longer, cost less. Minus points - Don't look as cool as my friend with race tires.

> If you are riding on the street and really need a race tire, you should not be riding on the street. Street tires give very good grip, enough to have a very fun time in the canyons. A street tire on the track will run about 1.5 seconds slower than a race tire. Compared to 15 seconds slower for the average street rider that goes to the track, it is easy to see that experience and practice makes a much bigger difference than just tire choice.
 

· I am craving sushi.
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4,317 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
This was the most interesting point of the article


TEMPERATURES: What does tire temperature have to do with performance? Lets first understand an old falsehood "Race tires won't stick till you warm them up" this is untrue and is a falsehood. Here are the facts. If you took a race tire and a street tire and ran them side by side, the race tire would provide more grip than the street tire in every temperature range. So if both tires are at 60F the race tire works better. If both at 160F, the race tire still works better. Now will a cold race tire work as well as a hot street tire? I don't know, it would depend upon the tires. (But I am sure that someone did this and fell down, then started the rumor. ) The big difference comes in the cold verses hot performance. A race tire get much better when hot. A street tire gets a little bit better when hot.
 

· pavement tester....
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Great Article. Kind of an eye opener a little bit. Its been my experience that Dunlops hold great, even when partially warm.. I had some Bridgestone Battlax's also and I prefer Dunlop over them.

I havent had the opportunity to try Michelins, but would like to. For my next track day I plan on throwing on some Rennsports cause I've heard nothing but good things about them.
 

· My R1 eats Gixxers
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Race tires are better all the time, everywhere. Anyone who has run back to back on on a ZR and a GP can tell you that. They are not in the same universe. 1.5 seconds lap difference? I'm skeptical. I would guess he means in the hands of the 15 seconds slower guy.
 

· My R1 eats Gixxers
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Brian0128 said:
I just picked up 2 sets of race take off's for 100 a set of the 207GP's....great shape, more tread off the sides than the middle....at least I know they have been heat cycled!! :)
In case you were unaware, they will grip fine until you try to throttle out of a corner. Then you can get a heat cycled GP to powerslide at will. It's great fun. OK, it's fucking hilarious. Wheeeeee!
 

· Registered
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Nice article. As for the comment about lack of feedback, I personally have recieved better feedback from race tires than any street tires I have ever ridden. Also, people have a myth about race tires breaking loose hard. This is completely false. Race tires, atleast the 208GP's and Pirelli SC1/SC2 slide very predictably and are easy to control. Unless you are a straight line hero, you will definately ride faster on Race tires.
 

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15 seconds

That's about right at PIR. Guys that come out and do novice stuff, usually " fast " street guys with a few track days or classes thrown in are typically about 15 seconds off of getting " near " a competetive race lap time;)
 
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