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slowest rider ..rides in front
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1,148 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
okay I am seriously thinking about being a professional rider

can someone map out a plan:yesnod

my idea of getting there ...

take a few race classes .. participate in a few local races .. get some sponsors and try to get notice .. if I don't get notice or win races then I guess I am not cut out to be in the industry .. atleast I tried:D

about me:

5'8
155 lbs
1 year and 6,000 miles behind me:eek:
(although I am new to riding I've been a long time fan of motorcycles.. I ride better than most people when they started out.. heck I can out ride them today)
I'm moving back home to California this Summer :thumbup (good-bye snow:finger )

any ideas welcome:fact
 

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My R1 keeps me up at night
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72 Posts
If you're serious:

I went to school with Colin Edwards when he was making his run to the top in high school. He did exactly what you mentioned. He started racing, won ALL his races, picked up a local sponsor, and the rest is history. It was all pretty exciting at the time. He was cool about it, and he used to have great stories when monday rolled around. Colin was a pure natural talent. I don't know about other racers, but I'm afraid you either have it or you don't. If you have to go to a lot of classes, then it ain't going to happen!

I'm not questioning your riding ability, but I hope you don't have any false illusions about racing. I know they make it look easy, but it would be like me wanting to play pro basketball. I think I'm good until I have to go toe to toe with MJ or the like.

Good luck! :cool:

Just my .02 cents.
 

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slowest rider ..rides in front
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1,148 Posts
Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
I understand both side of the coins .. I am a competitive athlete and I've seen talent then I've seen guys who are just hard workers .. now I don't want to be the hard worker type .. I believe in "natural raw talent" .. you either have it or you don't .. I can accept that if I don't have the talent .. but atleast I tried to explore my skills:D

I agree you don't need to take classes on how to become better .. what is taught are basics and from there on out it's all about talent and guidence.

I'll take your .02 cents and invest it:D

conquer your fear
 

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My R1 ate my R6
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2,565 Posts
Yoe are absolutlely right Longhorn. I consider myself good, I can outrun anybody who rides around here in the twisties(about 30 other guys) by a long shot, but when I went to race school, I got outrun by a lot of people, and I was scared of taking a Gixxer 1000 or ZX6 up the ass with all those other riding school guys behind me trying to brake late, so I let some of them get by just to keep from them slamming into me. Well anyway, I learned that I wasn't quite as fast as I thought when i got down there and reality kicked in. Hey, good luck to you though Solo.
:thumbup
 

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Registered
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456 Posts
club race

These guys are right, IF you have the bigtime talent, desire and drive to be good, you will know quickly.;)
I've just been this route with my kid, and he now races professionally in the AMA 250's ( starting with Sears point due to equipment delay, he's # 173 and rides alongside Nobi Iso on Aprilia 250 GP bikes).
FIRST, you have to be a dominant racer in your local area. The FIRST time Jonah EVER was on a STREETBIKE, ever on a rrace track he came from the backrow ( 7 rows back ) and smoked the entire lightweight novice field by over 30 seconds.
People in the know soon have stop watches out, and drop by your pit to check out the new guy.
I spent about $20 k racing with him here in the NW, Spokane, Seattle, Portland, every chance we had. Although we were down nearly 20rwhp to a lot of riders in SB or GP classes, he garnered excellent results in both series, a 2nd in 650 Gptwin, 3rd in the WMRRA series, and was ALWAYS battling for the lead in every race he entered. There were the newspaper articles, the 2 write ups in rracingworld young guns in the 2000 and 01 issues, orther smaller blurbs in that and other publicatins.
Then an offer to ride for Team Veloce where he totally dominated winning by huge margins and securing the 125 championship last season. This leads to training with faster riders like the 2000 japanese 125 national champ, and other offers.

My kid had an advantage. I was also an AMA pro rider in the 70's, so genetics helps. Also, although I NEVER EVER pushed motorbikes, he's been around this stuff, and the people for a long time.

In the end, first see if you can get up there with any of your local hotdogs. It's not as easy as it looks, and the other reality is how you are going to feel about racing after you've had a couple of big crashes. Big crashes are scary, and they've blown the wind out of many aspiring racers sails fast;) Good luck
 

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Banned
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1,511 Posts
Need a lot more than 6000 miles under your belt that's a drop in a bucket.i think this is a joke anyway so il play along first off if you haven't mastered the dirt then you ain't gonna master the pavement you need to understand what the edge of traction feels like first then you need to develop a style that is comfortable for you and practice practice practice.dont waste time at schools here in the states they have yet to produce any champions in a very very long time spies ok Hayden don't even count with his bs championship he won in gp shouldn't even be allowed to put the trophy on a shelf.seriously schools here teach it all wrong got people pointing foots off pegs hanging of like monkeys when not needed forcing people to support their weight on the inside foot.
 

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I miss my R1
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2,978 Posts
If you aren't already going through the ranks at 27, you won't be making the pros.
+1

If you're not already racing in a national championship by the time you're legally able to ride on the street, you're too old to make a career out of it.

Few few people who are racing professionally (or any other competitive activity) decided to do that as adults. And even those who decided to do it as kids needed parents who were quite wealthy to fund their development.

A lot of the young riders in Moto3 are actually paying the team to race the bike they're on.
 

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Mad Thou Rider
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2,742 Posts
I understand both side of the coins .. I am a competitive athlete and I've seen talent then I've seen guys who are just hard workers .. now I don't want to be the hard worker type .. I believe in "natural raw talent" .. you either have it or you don't .. I can accept that if I don't have the talent .. but atleast I tried to explore my skills:D

I agree you don't need to take classes on how to become better .. what is taught are basics and from there on out it's all about talent and guidence.

I'll take your .02 cents and invest it:D

conquer your fear
being an athlete and being a racer are different things, Im an mma fighter and its never taken me longer than 90 seconds to destroy someone in the cage, Im super fit, but at the track, Im mid pack at best.

If you are riding a 2000 R1 as in your profile, you have a fair way to go befor you understand the performance of the late model stuff.

Im not pissing on your parade, just trying to balance your expectations. If you want to race seriously, and you wanna gain sponsors, your best bet is probably to start out in a much lower CC support class, and start developing, or showing your ability there. If you can acheive that, then you will attract sponsors who want to help you acheive the long term goals of being a superbike rider.
 
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