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Discussion Starter #1
I've owned my R1 (2001- last of the carburettor model) since new and done 27k on it in 17 years. Maintenance and servicing for the past 10 years has been by me, so obviously I know the bike well, how it feels, as no one has ever mucked around with it.

Took it out yesterday and there was clearly a problem- idle-jets. It was fine over 4k but bloody awful low down- hunting and grunting. It also popped a few times on warm up.

This is the key to blocked pilot jets.

So- this is how you can do the job quick- rather than actually taking the carbs off the bike.
Ok, no free meal-ticket- you have to remove them from the inlet stubs.

• Remove the tank – put on a piece of carpet or similar- the scratch easily and if like mine, they are generally full of fuel.
• Remove the air box
• Remove the spark-plug caps, leads/coils and unplug them- put them somewhere safe- Unplug the coils from the socket that’s down near the throttle position sensor.
• -if the plug caps are not identified- (which they should be) mark them with a sliver paint, 1 , 2 and 3 (the one overs going to be 4 )
• Pull off the fuel feed supply hose
• Pull out the throttle idle adjuster- it just pulls off a bracket on the LHS and you DON’T have to remove the fairing at all to do all this.
• Take the vacuum hose off- I took the large one out of the AIS box and left it on the carbs.
• Now the fun- you cannot see the inlet stubs without a light and they are difficult to access- but basically, undo or slacken off whatever 3mm hex screws you can get to- if I’ve been successful uploading photos- you can see I ended up with 2 still on the carbs and 2 remining on the engine.
• Undo the choke cable- you just need to take the brass coloured plate of and rotate the cable and it will pop off.
• With all the pipes clear and wiring connectors, you should be able to pull the carb-bank skywards. Once its lifted- put a heavy towel or something on the frame and just rotate them upside down- then cable-tie them to the headstock.
• The benefit of doing this is that you skip disconnecting throttle cables, which can be a git- don’t forget- I knew this would be pilot jets- and that’s all I was planning on removing and cleaning.
• Get a decent screw bit and t bar or similar- I’m sure it’s a ‘No2’ as the 3 screws on each float-chamber are extremely tight and you do not want to slip off.
• Do one carb at a time- if you can’t undo one, move onto another!
• There will be a bit of fuel around, but just tell the missus to shut the window if she complains of the smell!
• Take out the pilot jet- it’s the one at the side of the MAIN JET.
• Take it and the float bowl to wherever you work area is and thoroughly clean both- My bowls looked very good but there were minute particles of grit in the bottom.
• I used the air-compressor and carb-cleaner to clean the jets- one was obviously blocked- I blew and sucked and nothing!
• One obvious thing is that the ingestion almost certainly came in from the end with the screw-slot- so logic dictates it needs to go back out the same way- !
• An air compressor helps, but not absolutely necessary.
• If you are lucky- you can re-use the float bowl O rings, but thee are likely to be compressed and the bowls will weep. You can replace these afterwards- yes, put it all back together and test it- then once you know the idle and low revs are working as they should or did- then its not the end of the world to backtrack- if you didn’t buy a set of new float-bowl gaskets.

• When they are all done and back on the carbs- its time to re-fit.
• Put the rubber stubs on the engine and by this time- you will have noticed the top and bottom clips that hold it all together.
• Clean the stubs with a clean rag and WD40
• Put a smear of very light petroleum jelly on the inlet stubs to assist the carbs going back on- don’t go mad- just a smear.
• Ease the carbs back on and they should just pop on and go no further.
• Now you know where the correct 3mm hex head screws are, you can go about tightening each carb onto its respective stub.
• Put the coils and plug leads back on.
• Connect the 2 electrical connections- the throttle position sensor and the coil pack supply
• Connect all the hoses including the AIS one
• Re-clip the throttle idle adjuster back in its clamp
• Reconnect the choke cable
• Re-fit the tank- I find it easier to put the back long bolt in and use a pice of wood to prop the tank up, while I connect the final 3 pipes and fuel sender- then lower the tank and screw the seat back on- and front tank hex screw.
• Turn the fuel tap on, turn the bike on and start-up.
• Hopefully, all is well, no leaks and a successful test run!
• Relax and have a beer.
 

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Great write up, thanks for taking the time to do this.

Just a couple of comments:

• put some rags in the inlet ports in case you drop something like a float bowl screw down one. That will really make your day if the valves are open on that cylinder. Also, make sure the towel under the carbs is positioned to catch anything you might drop.

• you might think about replacing the float needle valves, especially if the bike has done a decent mileage. It's an easy job and they're not expensive. Buy genuine parts though - aftermarket can be a lottery.

• an ultrasonic bath can help to clean the pilot jets, or leave them to soak in a strong solvent. Or just buy new ones if they're really bad - they're only a few dollars.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Don't worry- i had 4 old socks down the throats!

The point of my 'how to' was to get the bike running. new flat rebuilds would have been an advantage as the old seals dont hold petrol once they have been disturbed- kits are very expensive in UK and invariably aftermarket- not Yamaha!

I did this job yesterday- fine weather still and outside- I did one at a time, so Id be mighty unlucky to have dropped a pilot-jet. 2 were clear.

Ive never tried ultrasonic as I prefer to do it myself with carb-cleaner and 50psi!
 

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I couldn't see anything down the ports in the photos, so thought I'd mention it. I hope the socks were clean! :)

I didn't realise you were in the UK - parts prices can be much higher than the US for some reason. MikuniOz in Australia is another option - their prices are really good and they ship worldwide.

Ultrasonic is perfect for cleaning things like carb jets.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
2nd Pic has the socks! Wife launders all the 'old rags' and i mess them up. Yes, UK there are loads of R1s of that genre around here- the fall into 2 categories- 60's plusses like me who cherish them and the 'track day' sorts, which are usually heaps, but tuned within an inch of thier lives. As ive said- Ive had mine since new- it was the fisrt new bike Id brought, after years of heaps to suit my wife n 2 kids budget at the time. Ive a honda 400/4 and a Triumph Explorer- My age group are the only ones that can afford the insurance on them all- low risk....
 

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Well, my '99 4xv has done about 70,000 miles! It still goes well, just has a clunky 2nd gear. Usual 4xv electrical problems and I've done some stuff you'd expect at the mileage like new clutch, carb needle valves, etc.

I might replace it soon as the mileage is getting up there, but it's too much fun!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
In the time Ive owned my 5JJ, Ive had very few problems- so much so I can remeber-

Ignition switch shorted- couldt turn bike off , due to muck n crud- soreted with a was out of wd40 and re-lube

Leaking-misting headlights- replaced under warantee twice, but they still do it.

Exup-Valve (stupid idea)

Brakes going spongy- still on original lines! just needs a re-bleed now n then.

Rear swinging arm bearings worn- replaced with OEM parts and no difference really. was MOT failure

Clutch-cable snapped

Pilot jets

Considering that the bike was ridden all weathers for the 1st 2 years (and then I rode works supplied BMW R1200GSA's for 12 years)- the Yam has been 'bullet-proof' and reliable. The wheels have stayed bright and true, the frame is untarnished, the plastics on the fairling are still intact.

Maintenance and fussing has been adequate - especially oil-changes annually over the last 18 years. It still rides like it always did and only age and worry about getting caught speeding - there are cameras everywhere thesedays!...age has a bearing on throttle position...
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Just a warning- DO NOT GET CARB-CLEANER on the seals- the diphram or float-bowl O rings....(it will cause them to swell).

Wanna know how I know this...?
 
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