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O'Gradys Paint
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Let's, just for arguments sake, suggest the lap times between an R1 and an S remain the same for a given rider...after 20 hard laps on an R1S you'll notice how much easier it is to go out and do the same lap times with an R1...you'll likely have enough left over energy to do another 3-5 laps as you won't be fighting the gyroscopics nearly as much...but again...you'd need to be am expert to tell...
 

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Yes...
You will notice lighter wheels and spinning mass in the engine even doing the speed limit to the coffee shop. I really don't understand the argument that you can't tell unless you're an expert.

...and as goatse mentioned it becomes more pronounced the faster you go. Just try hitting a fast chicane with stock wheels vs. carbon and explain to me why you would need to be an expert to feel difference...
i have stock wheels so i cant really say. but i noticed a huge difference when i switched out the stock battery with a nice lite lithium battery. i hate when people have to use that unless ur an expert ... u really dont have to be an expert to notice these things. it's observation skills. $hit, if u have any sort of expeirence with bikes, u should totally notice the difference between any bike.
 

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O'Gradys Paint
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Even carbon wheels and rotors can't trump the rotating mass in the engine...a liter bike will always feel like a pig compared to a 600...and that's got nothing to do with static weight, wheelbase, geometry or mass centralization...
 

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Speed Junkie!
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367 Posts
Let's, just for arguments sake, suggest the lap times between an R1 and an S remain the same for a given rider...after 20 hard laps on an R1S you'll notice how much easier it is to go out and do the same lap times with an R1...you'll likely have enough left over energy to do another 3-5 laps as you won't be fighting the gyroscopics nearly as much...but again...you'd need to be am expert to tell...

Ok, I guess we can go on and on about this. We'll just have to agree to disagree. But I will leave a quote from the review of the R1S below with the link. Once the bike actually comes out we'll hear from more forum members and that will eventually settle it. Again, I want to be clear.....it's definitely worth paying the extra $1500 for the R1.


This Is The 2016 Yamaha R1S And You Should Buy It Instead Of The R1

The thing about it being such an amazing bike, is that it’s so far past most people’s abilities. So, let me sum it up for you real easy: If you’re good enough to feel/use the benefits of the R1 over the R1S, you should be on the R1M anyways and you should probably be racing MotoAmerica. It includes all of the fancy electronics of the R1, minus the quickshifter which is now an option instead of standard.
 

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Crossed Up
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Ok, I guess we can go on and on about this. We'll just have to agree to disagree. But I will leave a quote from the review of the R1S below with the link. Once the bike actually comes out we'll hear from more forum members and that will eventually settle it. Again, I want to be clear.....it's definitely worth paying the extra $1500 for the R1.


This Is The 2016 Yamaha R1S And You Should Buy It Instead Of The R1

The thing about it being such an amazing bike, is that it’s so far past most people’s abilities. So, let me sum it up for you real easy: If you’re good enough to feel/use the benefits of the R1 over the R1S, you should be on the R1M anyways and you should probably be racing MotoAmerica. It includes all of the fancy electronics of the R1, minus the quickshifter which is now an option instead of standard.
Just because someone can't push a bike to its limits, it doesn't mean the changes of the R1S wont be noticeable on a race track.

They aren't even related IMO.
 

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Logically, there may be no real reason to not buy the r2s..except...somewhere along the line, you'll do the math. At that point, you'll realize you saved 30.00, per month, and can really never update your r1s to the higher quality parts. The external thing,s no problem, but the con rods would be cost prohibitive.

Plus, a this point, I know I could buy a left over, unchanged 2015 model for 1 less than a 16 r1s.
 

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2016 60th
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51 Posts
Whats funny about most of the posts made so far, the bashing the pointing the ignorant thoughts pouring onto the keyboard, not a single person posting seems to have any idea how to build an engine for power, longevity, and reliability.

Why would the "tuner" say to get the R1S vs the R1? To be honest, the R1 has too light a crank. As it climbs the rpm band, it buzzes as harmonics dump itself into the block/drivetrain. A heavier crank is NOT going to do this. The more the rotational weight, the more it will absorb harmonics and transfer energy once in motion not lost in harmonics. Obviously when it gets too heavy, it will always lose to something a bit lighter. But with just the right amount of weight, it will do the same as the lighter counter part with NONE of the side affect of the lighter set up. An ideal set up would be the light rods of the R1 and the steel crank of the R1S. Coupled with the lighter valve train to absorb less thermal energy and require less rotational energy for motion transfer, is the name of the game for reliable power house engines.

Would I swap my 60th's engine with that of the R1S? Yes. I have no doubt the engine is smoother, where 99% of us will see rpm (3k-10k rpm), and will give much better tip-in throttle response on the street. Will it be faster on the track, for most the engine will not be the factor to determine the end result. The crankshaft and rotational assemblies are at the bottom and absorbed by the center of gravity. And due to the loss of unwanted vibrations from the rotating assemblies of the bottom end, less rider fatigue AND ENGINE FATIGUE in the end. WHEN my engine goes south, I will be stuffing in the R1S crank if it can be exchanged.

Side note: RPM band is lowered due to the valve spring bind and rod stretch at max rpm. Which are very easy to fix!

But dont let my comments stop you all, keep right on bashing the OP and his idea of turning a R1S into a track bike. Personally, add some lighter wheels; suspension goodies; aftermarket sub-frame; swing arm; and a solid tune. It would be a serious trouble maker in the hands of any normal person.
 

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99,

The crank in both bikes is the same. The real r1 has the lighter rods. You made your own point.

Unless I missed something, there was never a mention of a crank change. Just the rods.
 

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Registered
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Heads up... I'd rather have the R1S when it comes time to change out the clutch, stator, or timing cover on the regular R1...go check out the cost of those aluminum fasteners... any time you change a cover those fasteners have to be replaced because they stretch...that's not an issue on the R1S. But hands down you might as well fork out the extra cash and get the regular R1. The S Is silly...curious to see how long they sit on the show room floor....apparently it's not gonna be too long hahahaha!!!
 

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YGT, I believe there is a price point where the r1s would make sense. If the regular version is 16,500, then maybe its 12,999. At that point, youd have to think about saving 3500. Closer to 65,per month, if one is making payments. Even then, I know what I would do.

I cant think of a case where a company did well in taking a high end product, then tried to cheapen it.

Almost like buying an Escalade, but having it supplied with crank windows and an AM radio.
 

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I miss my R1
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Considering how many people end up buying aftermarket wheels, etc, unless you're a super serious track rider, I don't think the R1S is a bad idea.

If I was in the market, I'd probably buy one.
 

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Crossed Up
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The crankshaft and rotational assemblies are at the bottom and absorbed by the center of gravity.
I've got a hard time believing that. It's heaviest gyroscope on the bike, so it WILL have the most impact in handling and change of direction.
 

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O'Gradys Paint
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I've got a hard time believing that. It's heaviest gyroscope on the bike, so it WILL have the most impact in handling and change of direction.
The wheels are also at the center of gravity, that's why I use lead, it's soft and can be bent back into shape after an off...and weight doesn't matter...cause center of gravity...
 

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Too bad everyone was wrong and the r1s makes its power way sooner than upper models and actually accelerates faster. Downside is that lower redline so more shifting and lower gear speeds.
 
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