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Attention everyone this is a notice to remind you of our appointment with WCW on August 3rd for professional suspension adjustments. Please respond and let me know if you are going for sure so I can give a head count, and so I can start planning a time and meeting place for that morning.


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I'm so confused by this whole offset thing. We're talking mm at a time. Wouldn't you get the same result adding a link to your chain and moving the rear wheel back or is this actually changing the rake angle? Just curious.
 

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I'm so confused by this whole offset thing. We're talking mm at a time. Wouldn't you get the same result adding a link to your chain and moving the rear wheel back or is this actually changing the rake angle? Just curious.
What offset thing?
 

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The pages before they’re talking about offsets and changing the triple clamp at the bars and there changing it by MM. How much difference can moving the bars forward 3 MM matter. Wouldn’t adding or removing a link to your chain do just about the same thing by lengthening or shortening your wheelbase? Idk seems like a lot of work and money for not much change. Raising and lowering the forks or rear end along with moving the rear wheel forward and back would be much cheaper and give you the same results. Or am I missing something?
 

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Can’t figire out how to edit a post using mobile browser. Lol!! But I wanted to ask how does moving the forks forward and back by mere millimeters make a difference? Unless I’m misunderstanding what is being done. Are they changing the rake angle of the forks or just moving them forward or back?
 

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I thought that's what you were talking about, but hard to tell when bringing up a 9+ year old discussion and no quotes.

The offset triple clamps will adjust trail ultimately. It can be a useful adjustment depending on what has been done to the heights on the front and rear of the chassis.

 

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How to set up your R1's suspension:

1. First of all you will need two mates, a tape messure, some masking tape or gaff tape, a cable tie, pen and papper (p.s. Dont forget the bear and pizza)

2. When ready find a nice level, flat area to work in, like a shead or something.

3. Then get the cable tie and place it round one of the inner fork tubes (The crome tube). Slide it up to the outer fork tube (Gold one).

4. Place a small strip of tape on the swing arm as close to the axle as possible. Then another strip directly above on the duck tail of the bike. Under the rear R1 sticker some where.

4.2 Raise the fork tubes to 7mm above the top clamp. Messured from the face of the top clamp too the top of the fork tube. (Silver cap on the gold tube).

5. Lets set the static sag for the rear.

- Stand the bike upright, get your mates to hold it in possition, lift the rear so the shock is fully extended out and messure the distance between the two strips of tape (inside edge to inside edge). Write down that messurement.

- Then with all of your riding gear on sit on the bike with feet on pegs, as if riding the bike. With one mate holding the bike upright and the ohter to re-messure the same distance between the strips of tape. Write the messurement down.

- Next bounce up and down while on the bike a few times, in the upright possition. This is to help compensate for stucktion in the shock.

- Re-messure the disstance between the strips of tape again in riding possition. Write the messurement down. Bounce again and messure again.

- You should now have 4 messurements for the rear. The last three need to be added together and then divide it by three to get the true riders Sag messurement.

- Rear static sag should be set to 5mm - 10mm. To get this figure get the first messurment and subtrackt the true riders sag we have just calculated. The result of this calculation is the current static sag. If it is more than 10mm then increase the rear preload to lessen the sag, where possition 9 is the hardest. If less than 5mm decrease the preload to increase the amount of sag.

- After an adjustment is made re-messure the riders sag three times with bounces in between and work out the new true riders sag. Then calculate the static sag again, repeat untill a static sag of 5mm - 10mm is achived. (If this is not possible to achive the incorrect springs have been sold to you. Remember rider wieght is riding gear also. People that like soft rears will go for around 30mm of static sag, but I dont recomend this on the R1.)

6. Eat pizza and drink some bear.

7. Now set the static sag at the front. Its basicly the same as what has been done at the rear. The Static sag for the front should be 30mm - 35mm.

- First stand the bike upright with a friend at either handle bar. Push the cable tie up against the fork seal. Get your mates to raise the front off the ground and messure from the fork seal to the inside edge of the cable tie. write it down.

- Now as with the rear end, sit on the bike in riding gear and bounce a few times before possing in ring possition, with your mates holding the bike upright. Push the tie up against the seal again. Now get of the bike and lift the front off the ground again re-messure the distance from the fork seal to the inside edge of the cable tie. Write this down. Push the tie up against the seal again and repeat the proccess another two times.

- Work out the true riders sag as on the rear shock, then take the first messurment and take away the true riders sag to get the static sag of the front forks.

- If required adjust the preload to achive 30mm - 35mm of static sag. Remember at the front the less preload the more the sag and the more preload the less sag.

- After each adjustment re-messure the static sag untill achived.

- Drink some more bear. Well done the static sag is now set, front and rear.

8. Compression: At the rear set it to 3 clicks out from all the way in. At the front 5 clicks out from all the way in. Go for a ride and adjust to tast. Remember the rear is to stop rear end squat under throttal and the front to help stop front end dive.

9. Rebound: At the rear start at 5 clicks out from all the way in. At the front 4 clicks from all the way in. The rebound is how quikly the suspension will recover from going over a bump. The more you wind it in the slower the recovery, but the more stable mid corner when hanging of the bike. The more clicks out from all the way in, the bike recovers alot quicker, but bouncy hanging of th bike. You need to find a happy medium.

10. Tyre pressure: Front at 34psi - 36psi and the rear at 38psi - 40psi.

Hope this all makes sence to you. Have fun, you bike is about to transform itself into a beast........



Note: Compression and rebound settings for 2000 - 2001 R1.
Is this the best way to make the shock move stiff? Mines is real bouncy
 

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The pages before they’re talking about offsets and changing the triple clamp at the bars and there changing it by MM. How much difference can moving the bars forward 3 MM matter. Wouldn’t adding or removing a link to your chain do just about the same thing by lengthening or shortening your wheelbase? Idk seems like a lot of work and money for not much change. Raising and lowering the forks or rear end along with moving the rear wheel forward and back would be much cheaper and give you the same results. Or am I missing something?
This is actually a really good question, and your observations are based in sound logic. It's actually a question I asked my suspension guy, to which he looked at me with this amused look for a few seconds, then burst out laughing.
About a 40 minute whiteboard session (he had 3 very large whiteboards bolted to his wall) and a whole load of math rattled off at light speed, the basic gist of the whole thing is this:
  • My/Your question above is assuming a static 'system'.
  • Motorbikes are not a static system; forces are being constantly sent from front to rear, and those forces are revolving around several centres of mass. There are differences between raising/lowering forks in the triple clamp, and lengthening/shortening the wheelbase. You will get an 80% overlap in how those changes feel to you, but, there are differences in how the forces will be getting sent back and forth through the motorcycle.
It would take me pages to explain the subtle differences, and I doubt anyone would want to read that. BUT - all I can say is, why not experiment with these settings yourself? See what works for you.

IF you DO want to get into the details, grab a copy of Vittore Cossalter Motorcycle Dynamics: https://www.amazon.com/Motorcycle-Dynamics-Second-Vittore-Cossalter/dp/1430308613
 
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