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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys,
I am at a dilemma trying to choose which way to go between the inserts or the complete ohlins fork setup. Is their any benefit to going either way other than cost? This whole suspension thing is new to me, Ive always just rode stock suspension and delt with it. I would like to get a suspension dialed in for my weight. Thanks in advance for any input.
 

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In your particular case, the benefit of choosing the FGRT Forks vs. the 30mm Carts adds zero performance advantage. The FGRT will undoubtedly make your bike "look" faster with expensive gold forks, but I doubt you will go any faster on a set of FGRT forks vs. a well sorted set of 30mm NIX carts. The AMA Superbike guys race with OEM fork externals and cart kits.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
In your particular case, the benefit of choosing the FGRT Forks vs. the 30mm Carts adds zero performance advantage. The FGRT will undoubtedly make your bike "look" faster with expensive gold forks, but I doubt you will go any faster on a set of FGRT forks vs. a well sorted set of 30mm NIX carts. The AMA Superbike guys race with OEM fork externals and cart kits.
I like the sound of that, it means more money in my pocket. I just didn't want to go the cheap route and find out later I should have gone the other way and been kicking myself in the A$$!!!
Any one else with any input would be appreciated.
 

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The only major performance differences between the two are the FGRT forks are usually lighter, the tubes have less stiction due to the TIN coating and they are stiffer. Aside from that, the cartridges function the same way and are the same spec. The FGRTs also look awesome! With everything billet/machined, etc vs cast and mass produced.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks SBK, I'll be contacting you guys here in the near future.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-N900A using Tapatalk
 

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Ohlins FGRT 219 all the way IMO. Got mine two months ago...
 
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Ohlins FGRT 219 all the way IMO. Got mine two months ago...
were you able to use the speed sensor on the back of the left fork with these. I don't see a mounting bracket in the photos so not sure if they are an actual photo of the FGRT 219's
 

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Aren't the fgrt forks 20mm longer than the kyb ones. You could do with the extra height if your going to be doing a few trackdays.
Lee
 

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I haven't installed mine yet, since it's winter, and plus my R1 is in for the recall. I can get back with you when I install it.




were you able to use the speed sensor on the back of the left fork with these. I don't see a mounting bracket in the photos so not sure if they are an actual photo of the FGRT 219's
 
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Discussion Starter #10
SBK Unlimited can probably answer this for us.

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yeah.. the question is why aside to bling would it be worth going with the frgt forks.

If in fact they are 20mm longer and do weigh less(as SBU implies) then that is a great reason.
I wouldn't underestimate the effects of the inner fork tube coating either. The reduction in stiction can substantially improve suspension performance, particularly when the forks are under strain either in braking or extreme cornering (where maximum suspension performance is arguably most important).

If you've already made peace with spending some money on your suspension, I'd just bite the bullet on the FGRT forks now and know that you didn't leave anything on the table. Buy once, cry once.
 

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I wouldn't underestimate the effects of the inner fork tube coating either. The reduction in stiction can substantially improve suspension performance, particularly when the forks are under strain either in braking or extreme cornering (where maximum suspension performance is arguably most important).

If you've already made peace with spending some money on your suspension, I'd just bite the bullet on the FGRT forks now and know that you didn't leave anything on the table. Buy once, cry once.
I already have the 30mm NIX inserts on my KYBs and have just purchased a set of FRGT forks as I got a great deal from SBU. So once they arrive home I will do a full comparo on lenght and weight.
 

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Gian11
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Haven´t recevied my forks yet but had asked a forum member very close to Ohlins about this.. and I got this insight which I think is good to share with those on the fence of getting inserts or cartridges alone:

quote- The damping system used in FGRT219 is the same damping system as the aftermarket cartridge for the OEM KYB front fork. However, there are still two performance advantages of FGRT219. Due to the geometry of the outer tube, the bending stiffness is higher in the longitudinal direction and slightly lower in the lateral direction. Also, the friction characteristics of FGRT219 is much lower than the OEM KYB front fork (in fact, the OEM KYB front fork is really bad / cheap in this area). In total and according to riders that can really push both front forks, FGRT219 offers more contact feeling and feedback, from first touch of brake until apex, even though the damping systems are the same.

The delivery spec FGRT219 is 2 mm longer than the OEM KYB front fork (745mm vs 743mm). By changing the location of an internal spacer, the stroke and the total lenght can be increased by another 5mm.

/Thomas Alatalo - unquote
 

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If you had to choose between an ohlins rear shock or front forks which would be recommended first if you couldn't do bolth at the same time?
 

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An addition to the quote posted above:

The delivery spec FGRT219 is 745 mm long with 120 mm stroke.

By changing the location of an internal spacer, the length and stroke can be adjusted to 750/125 as well as 755/130. I would not recommend anybody to fiddle with this on their own, but any serious Ohlins service center should be able to adjust this even before delivery.

Only a few racers use FGRT219 (it's not legal in Superstock and most Superbikes use more expensive front fork concepts), but all of them tend to go for the 755/130 combo. The most common way with the 2015-2016 R1 is to raise the front and leave the rear pretty much stock or slightly lower than stock. By going for the 755/135 combo, you will be able to raise the front couple of millimeters and still have adjustment room in both directions.

If you had to choose between an ohlins rear shock or front forks which would be recommended first if you couldn't do bolth at the same time?
It's all about personal preference, but if you are really able to push your bike to the limit, I would say the OEM front fork is more of a limit than the OEM shock. It lacks stiffness and it suffers from excessive friction, affecting contact feeling and feedback in a negative way. The friction characteristics are worse than any other modern sportsbike and they are likely the reason why most street riders end up with all damping adjusters fully open.
 
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