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From sun up till sun down
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463 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 2004 R1 That I am putting back together. I want to have the frame, sub-frame and swing-arm powder coated gloss black. I wanted to know are there any precautions I should know about?!? The parts have to be baked correct? I want to know if this would weaken the frame?!?!
 

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Philly Rider
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407 Posts
No it will not damage the frame it really doesnt get that hot. A customer of my store does all kind of powder coating. Its called Quality Performance its in Drexel Hill PA. I can get you the number if you would like
 

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From sun up till sun down
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463 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
No it will not damage the frame it really doesnt get that hot. A customer of my store does all kind of powder coating. Its called Quality Performance its in Drexel Hill PA. I can get you the number if you would like
Hey, thanks for the info! Good looking bike by the way.
 

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Banned
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1,249 Posts
make sure you run taps in all the bolt holes when its done getting powered coated to clean out the threads cause if you just run a bolt in it will not be good been there done that one time.........it sucked
 

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Cheating death in the "D"
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21,068 Posts
I have a 2004 R1 That I am putting back together. I want to have the frame, sub-frame and swing-arm powder coated gloss black. I wanted to know are there any precautions I should know about?!? The parts have to be baked correct? I want to know if this would weaken the frame?!?!
Powercoat cure temps rarely exceed 400 degree F, and most are now using lower cure temp powders in the range of 275 degrees F. Cure duration rarely exceeds 20 minutes. This is not a concern with a frame or swingarm.

I highly recomend removing all bearings, races, fasteners etc., before powdercoating. Than mask all internal & external threads using either silicone plugs/masks, or high temp green masking tape. This will help eliminate headaches down the road, you don't want to spend a day grinding off powdercoating and retapping threaded holes.

Any reputable shop should do this, but its in your best interest to either do it yourself or oversee the masking process. Another thing is to make sure the correct powder chemistry is used, one that provides UV resistance, you don't want your frame/swingarm chalking (turning white) after a couple seasons.
 

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Draggin chest hairs since 2008
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1,313 Posts
Everything Rorlow said is spot on. I worked at a wheel repair shop where all we used is powdercoat... And be sure to remove all hardware, or anything that gets unscrewed, unbolted, unclipped, unwhatever! And mask everything off because if you powdercoat inside where a bolt goes, the bolt will no longer fit because the powder is so thick and strong
 
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