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Catch me........if you can!!!
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
i know this has been posted many times over in this forum. however, i wanted to get some fresh answers as they may pertain to my individual situation.
i am purchasing a new R1 on friday. i have never ridden a motorcycle before and wanted to know if this is really that terrible of a move? i'd like to add a few details about myself, in order to give you a bit of a description about myself and to fill you guys in a little better. i am aware of the motorcycle's capabilities in reference to power and that it must not only be used cautiously and with great responsibility, but also great respect. i'm 33 years old, 5' 10", 240 #. i'm a decent sized guy, so that is why i didn't want a R6, because i felt it would be too small. i do plan on taking a beginner's riding course next spring. i used to drive a truck, work construction, etc, and am used to being around machines with great power. i feel that if i had made this move when i was younger and irresponsible it might have been a bad one. i'm thinking that being older and more aware of the dangers, will assist me in this situation.

i guess what i'm asking is that if i am very cautious and taking the learning process slow and not go crazy with it, Is it possible to learn how to ride a bike with an R1 being your first bike? i mean, how long does it really take to get used to it?
 

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Hillary in the Whitehouse ? ?
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1,352 Posts
Sounds like a true test in "Darwin'ism".

Let us know all know how it goes!
 

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My bikes keep me sane.
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5,272 Posts
Since you've already bought the bike, I guess you're gonna find out firsthand if it was the right decision.

I think it's safe to say the majority of us here have climbed up the ranks(so to speak) of bikes. Starting out on smaller, less powerful machines.

Also, the years past in which some of us started out, bikes were nowhere near the capabilities they are now. It's amazing the technical strides that have been made.

Back when I started out, 1,000 cc bikes were putting out HP numbers lower than present day 750's. The 600's--which many of us cut our teeth on, were night and day difference from today's class. The 600's of today are so potent, even they are hard to suggest as a beginner's bike.

You do put into reference your age, physical size, knowledge of what this bike is about, and some sort of maturity level. Those, along with your willingness to enroll in the MSF course put you a small step forward.

It's easy to see people out on a bike and think you can easily go out and ride one too. What you may not understand is the lifelong learning experience that riding one becomes. I've been riding legally on the streets for 18 years now, and find myself learning things almost every day I go out riding. The more you know--the more you will pick up on. The progression compounds as your skills increase.

The biggest dangers of a liter bike for a beginner are(IMO) the spot on power anywhere that can get you in a hell of a situation should you panic, and the all too familiar need for speed. These things f**kin' fly!!!

Keeping a cool head, and always respecting what it is you have underneath you are a must. This thing will kick your ass in a heartbeat!!

Take your time, take the MSF course, and wear your gear!!! You have a long, but VERY fulfilling journey of bike riding if you do it the correct way.:thumbup
 

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Premium Member
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37,428 Posts
Eyespy said:
The MSF BRC course is woefully inadequate....
I never took it myself. But back to the subject.... I quote from the movie Heavon on Earth. The ride is perilous. If God wants to keep you alive, he may have something in mind. If not, may God bless you.

:thumbup
 

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My bikes keep me sane.
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5,272 Posts
Eyespy said:
The MSF BRC course is woefully inadequate....
True........but you also have to remember we see it from a different point of view. We have years of experience, whereas a beginner's core skills/knowledge are at a bare minimum.

A skilled rider can easily pick apart what it is lacking. This is exactly what I did when my girlfriend just recently went through it. Now I've taken up where the class left off, and teaching her the missed/forgotten???? things in the course.

Nothing beats the education you get from real-life seat of the pants riding out in the real world.
 

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Premium Member
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37,428 Posts
dbarocio1001 said:
i guess what i'm asking is that if i am very cautious and taking the learning process slow and not go crazy with it, Is it possible to learn how to ride a bike with an R1 being your first bike? i mean, how long does it really take to get used to it?
a conditional yes. I've had an R1 since 2001 and I haven't maxed her out yet...

oh and welcome
 

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Don't Piss Off An R1
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236 Posts
One thing that will be helpfully in your situation is the low torque in low RPM range. This will give you a little room for error, as to popping that front tire up. But like said before, RESPECT RESPECT RESPECT this bike. Keep your rpm's low and shift early. The one day you go out and rip on her, she will get pissed off and make you sh!t your pants and hopefully that is all that happens. The sad thing is you just bought a bike that you will never see her full potential. This bike has so much power and is so fast that it's just not normal. But anyways welcome to the liter class and please be careful. ENJOY Her and you won't be disappointed.
 

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Action figure sold separately
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12,213 Posts
hooligan_r1 said:
True........but you also have to remember we see it from a different point of view. We have years of experience, whereas a beginner's core skills/knowledge are at a bare minimum.

A skilled rider can easily pick apart what it is lacking. This is exactly what I did when my girlfriend just recently went through it. Now I've taken up where the class left off, and teaching her the missed/forgotten???? things in the course.

Nothing beats the education you get from real-life seat of the pants riding out in the real world.
My contention is that the BRC is inadequate even as far as the bare minimum required entry level skill is concerned. Factor into this equasion inadequate entry level training, a totally inexperienced new rider, and an R1 as a first bike, and you have a recipe for a very poor outcome.
 

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450 coming shortly...
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7,696 Posts
Looks like youve answered your own question/thoughts as youve picking it up tommorow. Personally I dont think an R1 is an appropriate bike for your first,but thats just my opinion:fact

All the best and hope it works out well for you bud,
-Pete:thumbup
 

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Catch me........if you can!!!
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222 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
thank you to all

i would like to stop and thank all of you who took the time to respond to my newbie question. i really appreciate your feedback. i will keep you all posted as to how things progress.
thanks again.
 

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TI
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1,919 Posts
JayDeFox said:
One thing that will be helpfully in your situation is the low torque in low RPM range. This will give you a little room for error, as to popping that front tire up. But like said before, RESPECT RESPECT RESPECT this bike. Keep your rpm's low and shift early. The one day you go out and rip on her, she will get pissed off and make you sh!t your pants and hopefully that is all that happens. The sad thing is you just bought a bike that you will never see her full potential. This bike has so much power and is so fast that it's just not normal. But anyways welcome to the liter class and please be careful. ENJOY Her and you won't be disappointed.
:iamwithst

do exactly what jaydefox says, you're a big guy and need a big bike as far as size. defintely undestandable respect it's power there's a lot of. 2nd year you have this thing rock out with your cock these things are amazing... :boobies
 

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R-Pun
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59 Posts
if you used to drive a truck and work construction, etc, then you are fully qualified to drive a new r1. :2bitchsla

Take it easy on the bike. The problem with the bike isn't until about 5-6 months after you start riding it. Every joe you see on the street will want you to do a wheelie. When you get better at riding it, and eventually start doing wheelies, thats when you start asking for trouble.
 

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R1-4FUN
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25 Posts
I did what everyone suggests..... & got an FZR600 as a first street bike. Had a few scary moments, but no accidents. This was after riding dirt bikes & quads for 25 years.

...As for the R1, It was easier to ride & I actually felt safer on it the moment I got it. The first time I went full throttle I got a nice wheelie & consequently some severe headshake when I set the front wheel down. The second was when the front brakes didn't work because the pads shook away from the rotors. All my previous experience did not train me for this, as the previous bike would barely pull the front wheel under power. Just 1 of many little issues to learn & understand.

Like you I waited until I was old enough & hopefully responsible enough to keep from doing anything stupid while riding. I can honestly say I have done some stupid things anyway. If the throttle turns all the way, you will likely do it eventually.

I've now had my R1 for 5 years & also very glad that I got it. I'll probably only sell it to buy another.

Keep in mind, it is a respect thing, never forget that or there may be a bad ending. When you are no longer afraid of the bikes potential, you have lost the respect & it is time to rethink things.... no matter how fast or slow the bike is.

Lost 2 friends last year... 1 on a race track. Today was also an eye opening experience. I found out my long time friend had died on a bike last night..... & he was cautious, experienced and the best rider I knew.
 

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Sorry to hear about your friends, Lonnie. :(

dbarocio, don't ever, ever, EVER pin the throtle in first gear. I'm taller than you, I'm heavier than you, I've logged 40,000 miles on large displacement sportbikes (after 6 surgeries on my left knee to remind me of the consequences of my or others' driving mistakes), and I'm scared to go past 3/4 throtle in first. Do you remember the button Tommy Lee Jones told Will Smith never to touch, in Men in Black? Do you remember what happened when he pushed it? That's what an R1 will do in first gear. When I graduated from a 75 hp KZ750 to a 138 hp ZX9, I realized after a month of hammering through the gears, that I wasn't breathing through the first 3 gears. And it took me a month to realize this! Your R1 makes 172hp! I'm new to the R1 too, and it is astounding the power this thing makes. It does 147mph in the quarter. That's 4 city blocks. I'm also in construction and I have a 10,000k telescoping forklift. It has 72hp and does 17mph in the quarter. Nothing, not a vet, not a mustang, not hemi, nothing could possibly prepare you for the level of accelleration your in for. I was out the other day on my favorite semi-twisty road (Iowa), and I was coming out of a 90mph sweeper in 5th gear. There's a road that intersects 3/8 of a mile past the corner. I kept the throtle pinned until I was probably 1/8 mile from the road, glanced down and I was doing 171mph! And that's in 5th gear, if I had been running through from a stop, I wouldn't have even shifted to 2nd gear by the time I was doing 90!

Sorry for all the exclamation marks, but I cannot even fathom the shear panic that a newbie would feel if he accidently pinned the throttle to early in the learning process. And the real danger is that you will become completely intoxicated by all that power, well before you develop the necessary skills to handle it. All I can say is keep your rpms down, be suspicious of anyone behind the wheel of a car, and pray (a lot). :bash
 
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