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Premium Member
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6,235 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I remember doing rolling stoppies on the RR '93 bike and I was quite good at the end before I killed it.. :p

Anyhow, when I tried rolling stoppies with the R1 I immediately felt that the bike's suspension is a lot softer and had longer to travel before an immediate stop occured (where the rear will start lifting off the ground).

I liked the RR'93s front suspension. It was hard.. but very good. It had good stability.

Can I stiffen up the R1's front a bit maybe? And exactly which parts should I start turning on.. or.. you know..
 

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My R1 Eats My Pay Check!
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152 Posts
This is my first reply on this forum so bear with me if I screw up...

IMHO, you should setup your suspension for your style of riding, then adjust your technique for stoppies accordingly. If you setup your forks just for stoppies, normal riding could suffer. I don't have any probs at all doing stoppies with the forks setup to conventional norms. Try this technique: think of a stoppie as a 2 step process. Step 1: apply just enough front brake to compress the forks. Step 2: apply a little more front brake so the back wheel comes up slowly. Step 1 is vital. If you dont compress the forks first, you are much more likely to turn your r1 into a pogo stick (not a good thing...believe me). I can go into much more detail if you'd like.

Give it a shot....& GOOD LUCK
 

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Road Warrior
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721 Posts
I agree with the two step process - brake to settle the chassis, then use a second brake action to control the height/speed of the stoppie. Smooooooth is the word :cool:
 

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Premium Member
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Discussion Starter #5
Yep! The thing with my RR was that it was stiff from the beginning. You didn't have to take two steps of braking before the back would raise. It was insane! But fun! :rock
 

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My insurance eats me...
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245 Posts
The reason the R1 feels so much softer is because it has progressive springs. The spring rate is softer in the initial inches of suspension travel then the spring rate changes in the last few inches to soak up big bumps. It's great for providing a supple ride but not so good for stunts and 10/10ths riding. It you like the harder feel of your RR, ditch the stock springs and pick up a pair of contant rate fork springs. Just be sure to match your shock spring if you decide to change rates.

Good luck.
 

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My insurance eats me...
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245 Posts
Springs aren't too expensive, but the labor involved in stripping down the forks is what will get you. The best way to do it is to get an aftermarket kit and do it yourself. However, if you don't know how a suspension works, DO NOT TOUCH IT. Sacrifice a few bucks and have a professional do it.
 

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Premium Member
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6,235 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
I've dismounted the forks on my CBR900RR a gazillion times. But I think I will leave it anyway. Cuz I don't want to mess things up. :)
 
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