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Discussion Starter #1
Summarized self intro:

I joined this forum back in 2005 as a lurker. I’ve wanted to get an R1 since 2000, but fear and procrastination held me back. I finally took the beginner MSF class in late 2018, but I failed the damned skills test. So I ran to the DMV and got a permit instead. Then I ran to the nearest Yamaha dealership to get an R1, but came to my senses and got a new R3 instead. I was a weekend rider on the R3 for several months. Took me a couple of tries, but finally got my endorsement halfway through the year. Failed the DMV skills test the first time due to nerves getting the best of me. I failed the MSF for the same reason. As soon as I got my license, I ran to the dealership to pre-order the 2020 R1. 4 months later, three weeks ago, I finally got the R1. Beautiful piece of machinery, although the stock exhaust is a little disappointing.The R3 sounds like a lawn mower, the R1 sounds like a bigger lawn mower. But I hear a full exhaust cost up to $2k, so I’m gonna have to live with the sound for a while. Riding is definitely not cheap, insuring the two bikes with a year of riding experience cost an arm and a couple of legs.

But I’m hella enjoying it. I go fast on the straights, slow on the corners, I think twice before splitting lanes, and I have huge chicken strips on my tires, but I have a big smile on me whenever I’m sitting on the bike.

Happy to officially join the forum once again.
 

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Welcome to the forum and sweet bike c_five, I love the blue.. Congrats on the purchase. Its such a great feeling.

I own a couple of bikes too, but if you really do not need 2 bikes, you could sell the R3 and use the money to upgrade the R1 a little. Just an option, unless you are financing it.

It sounds like you are still fairly new at riding, and if you are, an R1 is quite a machine for an inexperienced rider. If you are still trying to learn how to ride fast, I would recommend you work on your skills with the R3 instead of the R1. You don't learn at your limits as you are reacting instead of being more calm and focused on what you are trying to learn. Also, if you make a mistake, you would rather it happen to the R3 instead of the R1.

Please read the forums under Technique & Riding to get some technique advise and for god's sake, watch the cornering bible "Twist the Wrist II" by Keith Code.


 

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Discussion Starter #5
I’m keeping both bikes for now, although I only take the R3 out every now and then to make sure the battery stays charged. I might eventually sell it just because I don’t think I’ll be riding it much anymore. Plus I’m paying a ton for insurance for something I barely ride. The R1 is definitely too much bike for me, but I’m getting used to it. I’m in no rush to learn how to go fast around corners. I’ll get there. The R3, on the other hand, has felt dog-slow since I’ve started riding the R1 — it just doesn’t feel the same. I feel like getting better on the R3 won’t translate to getting better on the R1. It might be better to just get used to the power/weight of the R1.

I’ve seen all of the instructional videos on YouTube. I’ve seen all of the crashes/accidents/etc — you learn a lot from these! I’ll be going through the posts in Technique and Riding. Thanks for pointing it out.
 
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