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Discussion Starter #1
Hello dear members;

Here is a fairly quick and inexpensive way of preventing electrical problems and other miscalenous diagnostic codes on your bikes.

Every owners should take the time to buy a tube of silicone dielectric grease and go through the entire wiring on your bikes.
All plugs and connectors should be serviced,no exceptions.

Removing the tank and some pieces of bodywork is necesary in that case,but beleive me,its well worth it.

After,you wont get false error diagnostic codes just because you simply washed your pride and joy.
No loose contacts will produce heat and eventually melt the connectors(well,at least not as easily!).

Sometimes,water can find its way into a connector,producing a temporary short circuit which will then give an error code to your computers.

Also,a loose plug or connector,while riding on a bumpy road or such,wont make a good contact and will eventually produce heat which will then melt plugs and connectors(one of the rectifier/regulator cause of failure).

The dielectric grease will then or get rid of the problems,or at least help prevent them.

If anybody would like to add to this post,be my guest :)
 

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Truer words have never been said!

I have preached this for years. Looks like some people even listened!;)

I learned this from years of working with electro-hydraulic control electronics on construction and agricultural equipment.

Thanks for spreading the word Martin!

Sam
 

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It is time cosuming but defintely worth it. I learned this valuable lesson from the world of jetskiing!
 

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I've worked in the mining industry rebuilding and maintaining equipment for the last 9 years. Dielectric grease and anticorrosion sprays are a godsend.

Troubleshooting is generally very poor in most mines. So if a starting system has a high voltage drop in it most guys will change a starter or a battery, hell maybe even the alternator when it just needed one connection cleaned or replaced. (some guys don't know how to use a multimeter). I know when I wire a machine that 5 bucks worth of no-oxide will save thousands of dollars in electrical components down the line.

Martin is giving good advice with the di-electic grease. Only thing I can add is to ditch the high powered headlights and your electrical system will thank you.
 

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Where can I purchase dielectric grease?
 

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Thanks alot!!
 

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SIN said:
Have you considered not going to the spray wash? It would be easer.

I guess it all depends upon your definition of easier.

The 2002~2003 R1 has about 50 pair of electrical connectors. Earlier models have less. Of the 50, only about 10 really need dielectric grease, but doing all 50 will only take about 3 hours max.

Compare that to the time difference between hand-washing or power-washing your bike once every week or two. I think the time and effort savings are self-evident

Sam
 

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Martin - thanks for the info.

but whats the easiest way to apply the silicon ?

brush or gently going through each connector by hand ?

btw wont the red or black silicon look very untidy on the wires ?

sorry about all the questions
 

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pep boys sells a clear di electric greese for the end of spark plugs works great. oohhh by the way I went through every plug and just dabed it in there.
 

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I just cut all the connectors off,and soldered the connections back together with shrink- wrap, no problems here.
 

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Broke old fat and slow!
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Silicone dielectric grease/oil connector lubing!
YEP!!
He is right.
I know it because for years I worked for connector making company, and guess what ALL CONNECTOR CONTACTS WERE and stil are lubed IN THE FACTORY!
(PS, Connectors for missiles airplanes some for cars.)
 

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K916 said:
Martin - thanks for the info.

but whats the easiest way to apply the silicon ?

brush or gently going through each connector by hand ?

btw wont the red or black silicon look very untidy on the wires ?

sorry about all the questions

I'm not Martin, but I can answer your questions.

First off, I think you may have silicone sealant confused with silicone dielectric grease.

Silicone dielectric grease is typically translucent/opaque, rather than colored. Also, silicone dielectric grease never solidifies (gets hard), but stays 'greasy', like any other grease. You will most likely not find silicone dielectric grease at your local hardware store, but will instead find it at an auto parts store.

To apply the grease, you must 'un-plug' the connectors from one another, and simply squeeze a small amount onto each contact on each connector. You then simply snap the connectors back together. Done!

Sam
 

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Hooligan said:
I just cut all the connectors off,and soldered the connections back together with shrink- wrap, no problems here.
Yup, and that works fine if you plan on never disconnecting the wires from one another.

Silicone dielectric grease is used in connectors and on connections that are intended to be easily disconnected.



FWIW, the best connection you can make, if properly done, is a crimp-connection, as odd as that may sound. A soldered connection can have trapped gas (oxygen = oxidizer) or flux which can deteriorate a connection over time. A properly executed crimp-connection is gas-tight, meaning that in the crimp process, all the gas is driven out and it then becomes, in essence, a 'vacuum-tight' connection. The wire and the terminal essentially
become 'one'.

I'm not saying that your soldered connections will fail, because they will most likely be fine, but when I make permanent connections, particularly in a mobile application, I always use a crimp-type connection, and depending upon the application, a piece of adhesive-lined heat-shrink tube to finish it off. The adhesive lining helps to then further seal the connection.

Sam
 

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Discussion Starter #18
What I did on my wiring loom is seal all the back of the connectors where the wires go in with bostik(hot glue) and packed the connector really well with the dielectric grease;its important to pack the connector well so no moisture can be trapped though.

I did that mostly on the most vulnerable ones.

I check them from time-to-time and it works...but its also time-consuming.
I had the new loom in my hands when I did that.
 

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martinc said:
...What I did on my wiring loom is seal all the back of the connectors where the wires go in with bostik(hot glue) and packed the connector really well with the dielectric grease;its important to pack the connector well so no moisture can be trapped though....
....and it is for this very reason I don't recommend that the back of the connectors that are not designed as a sealed connector, be sealed.

If a person is careful and:

1) Does not allow any sealant to migrate to the contacts
2) Does a perfect job of sealing around the wires
3) Packs the connector full of dielectric grease

Then it should be OK.

Historically, I have recommend that the dielectric grease be used to coat the contacts and be applied in sufficient quantity to displace each individual contact chamber volume.


When a connector that is not designed to be environmentally sealed is 'sealed', it can become, what I call, a 'coffin'. A 'coffin' is an enclosure or connector that is almost perfectly sealed, but not quite. What can happen is that since the connector was not originally designed to be sealed, the mating surfaces are not sealed. Typically, they are close fitted, but not sealed. The small spaces created by the close-fitting surfaces creates, in effect, a capillary tube that will actually 'suck' any standing fluid that may reside on it, into the enclosure or connector.

Given this, if the connector is fully-packed with dielectric grease, such that upon reconnection, dielectric grease is forced out through these close-fitting vias, the likelihood of moisture ingress is then pretty low.

So, as Martin says, if you seal the backs of the connector where the wires enter with either a silicone sealant or a hot-glue, be sure then to pack the connector FULL of dielectric grease upon reconnection.

Sam
 

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Sam Farris said:
I'm not Martin, but I can answer your questions.

First off, I think you may have silicone sealant confused with silicone dielectric grease.

Silicone dielectric grease is typically translucent/opaque, rather than colored. Also, silicone dielectric grease never solidifies (gets hard), but stays 'greasy', like any other grease. You will most likely not find silicone dielectric grease at your local hardware store, but will instead find it at an auto parts store.

To apply the grease, you must 'un-plug' the connectors from one another, and simply squeeze a small amount onto each contact on each connector. You then simply snap the connectors back together. Done!

Sam
Thanks sam - yes i had that confused for silicon sealant.

now to hunt for dielectric grease in India !
 
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