Yamaha R1 Forum: YZF-R1 Forums banner

61 - 80 of 116 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
All electrical connectors?

Even the ones for each spark plug and all the sensors?
I would guess you didn't screw with the ECU connection?
I have 2 tubes and since I have all my plastic off and the tank raised this would be a good time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
I guess I should also do the plug boots. That's the exact reason they sell the little packs of dielectric at the auto parts when you get new plugs for your car.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
I used it on the plug boots, coil connections, sensors, and other connections in that area while I had the tank up to replace the plugs.
The only problem I had was keeping the front wheel on the ground when I went riding yesterday. hehe
 

·
R190-`Tyre Fryer`
Joined
·
2,683 Posts
does anyone know if di electric grease is the same white paste used as heat sink grease on computers? also someone told me it is hella carcinogenic, but that must be why its so good :)
 

·
Life: Comedy or Tragedy?
Joined
·
37,599 Posts
No, it's a different compound.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
591 Posts
Okay, I'll bite. What's "heat sink grease" and how is it used?

r1_dav3 said:
does anyone know if di electric grease is the same white paste used as heat sink grease on computers? also someone told me it is hella carcinogenic, but that must be why its so good :)
 

·
R190-`Tyre Fryer`
Joined
·
2,683 Posts
heat sink grease is also called thermal paste in computer circles.. on your chips especially the CPU and GPU there is a aluminium heat sink mounted.

the thermal paste is very similar in appearance to di electric grease and is pasted onto the chip surface to ensure good contact with the heat sink face
 

·
Life: Comedy or Tragedy?
Joined
·
37,599 Posts
r1_dav3 said:
heat sink grease is also called thermal paste in computer circles.. on your chips especially the CPU and GPU there is a aluminium heat sink mounted.

the thermal paste is very similar in appearance to di electric grease and is pasted onto the chip surface to ensure good contact with the heat sink face
In laymen's terms, it's a heat transfer agent. :lol :lol


The difference between the two is that dielectric grease doesn't harden, while the heat sink goo does.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
591 Posts
what grease would be appropriate to make it easier to plug and unplug my usb and firewire things? I was thinking a dab of dielectric grease might do it, but I would hate for things to get messy.

Mark
(a layman)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,248 Posts
Just double checking, is this the right stuff???

Link
 

·
We're in the pipe, 5 by 5
Joined
·
2,191 Posts
R1LOON said:
Just double checking, is this the right stuff???

Link
Blinking 'eck, click back a few pages..

All details posted to Chuck on this post..

RS Silicon - Dielectric Grease

RS Components http://rswww.com
DEF59.10 silicone grease,100gm tube £3.83
RS Part Number : 494-124
 

·
doin it with the r...
Joined
·
451 Posts
so im going to put this stuff on the connections only right? not on the wires themself correct? sorry if im asking a dumb question.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,085 Posts
Discussion Starter #76
so im going to put this stuff on the connections only right? not on the wires themself correct? sorry if im asking a dumb question.
yup.

No need to put some everywhere though...charging system connectors and all the ones at the front+those that could collect water when you wash the bike.
 

·
Life's a Bitch & I'm her Pimp.
Joined
·
141 Posts
Hey guys, haven't been on here in quite a while, but I figured this would be a good post for me to jump in on. (I work as an engineer for Lexus, and will be around to jump in on more of the technical and theoretical questions).

Silicon Dielectric grease is designed to lubricate and seal your electrical connections. It also has plenty of other uses, I personally use it to lube rubber seals (good sealing grease for dirtbike air filters). The standard dielectric grease I use is 3M Silicon Paste, available in a 8oz can. And I use it on every connector on my bikes and cars, including battery terminals, secondary (spark plug) wires, and light bulbs.



The grease is a dielectric, meaning insulator. It does not allow electricity to flow through it. However, when used on a good connector, the terminals will displace the grease and allow proper current flow. The reason to use an insulating grease is to keep environmental contaminents out, and voltage in. If you have ever seen a spark plug with carbon tracings down the porcelain, you understand how voltage can leak from a connector.

As previously mentioned, apply a liberal amount to the connector before fastening. I usually prefer to just toss on a rubber glove and scoop it with my finger. The grease will fill the connector, keeping water out and preventing corrosion. I also recommend applying dielectric grease to all light bulbs before installing to prevent corrosion (on old twist-in base automotive bulbs, use the brush to cover all of the exposed metal, then plop a little extra into the socket).

Oh yeah, I also recommend it on the slide pins of any automotive floating calipers. It will keep the pins free, and won't swell the rubber boots or bushings.
 

·
Life's a Bitch & I'm her Pimp.
Joined
·
141 Posts
Personally, I get it at work. And we buy it from an industrial chemical distributor. However, I searched google for "3m silicone paste 08946", and found plenty of places selling it (it also looks like there's a bunch on ebay). Oh yeah, 08946 is the part number on the can (that's why i put it in the google search).
 
61 - 80 of 116 Posts
About this Discussion
115 Replies
46 Participants
ebags
Yamaha R1 Forum: YZF-R1 Forums
R1-Forum is a Yamaha R1 motorcycle enthusiasts community dedicated to Yamaha YZF 1000 R1 sportbike. Discuss performance, customization, specs, reviews and more!
Full Forum Listing
Top