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The US has ZERO oversight or regulation when it comes to so many things and motorcycles is another one. If an 18 year old has the means, they can purchase a bagger Harley or a hyper bike. Both bikes to me are equally dangerous.
I wouldn't ever suggest someone get an R1 without at least several years good experience. Because someone can ride 20 years and could have been doing it wrong the entire time. So years alone don't account for anything.
Too many people want their first bike to be their bike, not realizing there's plenty of times for R1 and other liter and hyper bikes. Remember that Spider-Man quote about power and responsibility...
 

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Planning to get one as my First bike, am fully aware of the amount of power the R1 have, I believe its the best option for me. Some will say or already said you will get yourself killed or so, well if you planing to go so fast without paying any attention to traffic you will get killed even if you ride a bicycle. ride safe and responsible.
 

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Planning to get one as my First bike, am fully aware of the amount of power the R1 have, I believe its the best option for me. Some will say or already said you will get yourself killed or so, well if you planing to go so fast without paying any attention to traffic you will get killed even if you ride a bicycle. ride safe and responsible.
It really all depends on what you want from a purchase of a bike. The R1 was designed for the track. The R1 is a well mannered bike that has a dark side, it not respected, it will hurt you... Its impossibly tall geared in stock fashion that required a deft clutch and throttle inputs and sucks to ride in traffic and make for a very uncomfortable ride for any long distances.

If your just looking for Poser Bike, it definitely fits the bill.

If your looking to build good muscle memory skills, and progress into a competent rider who will survive to ride into future, there are better choices. Think street legal dirt bike: DRZ-400 for example, with or without street tires. A complete blast to ride, more forgiving, and will develop good skills much faster than a Hyper sports bike, which by the way any 600cc sport bike falls into the same category as a Liter Bike and is just as a bad choice for a first bike. If this is truly some one's first bike, I could out corner them with my 1992 XR250 shod with DOT knobbys. Probably on the back wheel.

Street legal dirt bike are also cheeper to insure and cost less to fix when you drop it. And drop them you will.... Hopefully not a low side, or worse, a high side at speed which may require a transportation to the nearest trauma center. Most incidents do. Think about this thread when your laying off into the bushes, trying desperately to breath, involuntarily moaning, crying in pain, and wish that this incident was a bad dream, because your hurt, and your beautiful new bike is wadded mess.

The trouble with us men is we think with the wrong brain and we are invincible. Most of here are not trying to squash your dreams, we speak form experience and want our sport to flourish. We also want our insurance rates to remain affordable, and to prevent legislation from preventing access to theses fun toys.
 

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Thread killer...
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I think I have said this before (maybe even in this post), but what you are going to do with the bike is probably the biggest factor involved with picking a bike. Any decent sport bike can get you killed in the blink of an eye, so the R1 is not anymore dangerous than the rest, especially the new versions with all the electronic helpers.
 

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Tlrich thank you very much for your advice i will consider everything you said when the time comes to buy a good reliable bike.
If you can, get a 2015 over a 2009-2014 model. The 2015 feels a lot more like the CBR1000RR, in that it's centre of gravity is lower and it handles like a 600. I've owned a few R1's and a few other 750 & litre bikes, currently I own 2001 & 2012 R1's, KTM 525 EXC, and Honda Hawk GT 650. I used to have a 1199 Panigale S, '88 Slingshot GSXR 750, Buell 1125CR, 2000 R1, and ZX12R in the garage but they're all gone. The 2001 is by far the easiest to ride of my R1's; it's lighter, the power delivery is monstrous but yet smooth and well behaved, and it feels a LOT more manoeuvrable. It is *much* easier to throw around the twisties.

As far as twisty carving, the Hawk GT is the best I've ever owned. Nothing touches it; I take it to the track when I want to humiliate people on litre bikes. It's got 45ish HP, and looks dorky. But honestly, I can't express how hilariously good it corners, and how useable every one of it's 45ish HP is. I honestly can't. It's the sweetest handling bike I've ever ridden, even better than my 2 Aprilia's ('05 RS125 & '01 RS250) (Suspension has been done though - Penske rear shock + GP suspension forks) Next is the 525 EXC, that thing blasts through twisties. Anything under 60mph and you have to be Valentino Rossi to keep up on a sports bike. My bike that demands the most effort and concentration in the twisties is the 2012. Even with TC it's a handful, it kicks and bucks and lays rubber everywhere. It's more like riding my dirtbike than any of my other road bikes. Don't get me wrong I absolutely love it, but it is HARD WORK and out of all my bikes it relishes every opportunity to try and kill me (kinda like my ex girlfriend haha).

Honestly, if it's your first bike, you're going to be starting on one of the hardest litre bikes to muscle around. You better have a good dirt riding background or be prepared to put in some time on the track being taught how to get on top of it. Also, if it's your first bike, I cannot stress enough - throw away the standard suspension and install a decent shock, the superbike linkage, and fork cartridges SPRUNG FOR YOUR WEIGHT. Also, drop the forks in the triple clamp by 2-3mm, it will help the bike to turn in a lot easier. It *will* sacrifice front end stability at high speeds (120mph and higher) but seriously, much more important for your safety and life is making those models turn in easier.

I had a crash back in 2008, and if it weren't for an old rider reviving me at the side of the road I would have remained dead. It took me around 18 months to get proper coordination and function back in my legs, and I still have numb spots in different places in my back. It has been HARD work getting my balance back, and f#cking the missus was a mishap for quite a while. I tell you what, when you spend almost 2 years wondering if your legs will ever work properly or if you're every going to root as well as you used to (seriously, it alternated between awkwardly coming early or just not coming at all; getting half up, having the sensations inconsistent and operation 'unreliable' - explain that to some chick you've picked up from the bar!) I was lucky my GF was a rider too and had survived her own crash. She was really understanding, but dude, very few girls are gonna be as patient as she was. And it's [email protected] humiliating let's be honest.

So honestly, if you weigh up starting on a bike that's trying to kill you and is hard work to flick through twisties, which you HAVE to have your absolute A game on ALL THE TIME to keep up to other guys you're riding with, versus trying to pick up chicks from a wheelchair or having your pecker behaving embarrassingly, it better be worth it. You need to have muscle memory, you NEED to have your riding instincts already wired into you, because when that pig of a heavy big-bang runs wide, kicks out, starts a wobble mid corner and you have to ride it like a dirtbike (if you let that throttle off, YOU WILL FLY. Ever been in a highside? I have - 10 ft in the air... the landing was HARD.) you better have your 'look where you want to go, NOT on the thing you're going to crash in to' instinct fully engaged... I'm just saying, you need to be realistic about the mountain you're about to climb.

I'm one of those guys who always went hard, figured '**** it, I'll go all out' but dude, when your legs ain't working properly and your dick ain't working right almost 2 years later... you reconsider how much your pride and ego really was worth risking everything for.

I'm not saying don't do it. The big bang R1 is an amazing bike to thug about on - that roar, the rumbling thunder, the mean-as-anything looks, it's such a bad ass bike. Just for the love of God, if you want to push it around twisties and learn how to ride properly, with this model, you NEED to do that at the track. With riders who can mentor you on body position, rearset height, suspension settings & geometry, and building in all the instincts you'll need to keep yourself from perving at chicks from a wheelchair for the rest of your life.
 

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I believe it has a lot to do with the maturity of a person. I started off with a 250, made my mistakes. Upgraded to a 600 shortly after that and kept it for a couple of years. A few months ago I got my first liter bike, my R1. I consider myself a pretty mature person, but starting off with an R1 probably still would have been a horrible idea. But to each his own...
 

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I like my R1
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It really all depends on what you want from a purchase of a bike. The R1 was designed for the track. The R1 is a well mannered bike that has a dark side, it not respected, it will hurt you... Its impossibly tall geared in stock fashion that required a deft clutch and throttle inputs and sucks to ride in traffic and make for a very uncomfortable ride for any long distances.

If your just looking for Poser Bike, it definitely fits the bill.
So... By your definition anyone who doesn't use their R1 at the track is a poser...?? It sounds like you have some form or degree of sportbike elitist syndrome.

While I agree with most of what you said I highly disagree with you on that. The R1 makes a great street bike IMO.

But anyone who pushes their abilities to the limit will eventually pass their limit and biff it. All that matters is that you can get back on and figure out what you did wrong then try not do it again. I've been riding bikes for about 13 years. I know I don't know everything, or even much, about the sport of motorcycling but I know my limits. And just because your bike is way more capable than what you put it through doesn't make you a poser, a squid(idk if that even has the same meaning it had 7 or 8 years ago) or whatever people want to say.

Now, I don't recommend an R1 as your first bike. Mostly because it gives false confidence to people who may not know how to interpret the feedback. Now, If you get an R1 expect to eat it. But to be honest your gonna eat it eventually no matter what bike you get. The R1 might make it sooner than later but its always your job to minimize bodily damage. You can fix the bike but you may not heal the same way. So be CAREFUL. You can never be TOO CAREFUL. Don't let these guys get cheap parts from your old bike on eBay. Ride smart and be humble. Regardless of what bike you ride.
 

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So... By your definition anyone who doesn't use their R1 at the track is a poser...?? It sounds like you have some form or degree of sportbike elitist syndrome.
Nah, you just got the wrong end of the stick. Otherwise you're bang on.

I like to cruise on the R1 and the bike is pleasant enough for that, but a) there are much nicer (first) bikes for that and b) the R1 can be annoying in traffic, especially where you can't filter / lane split and have to sit there. My R1 gets hot enough in Scotland, don't even want to know what it's like in Texas. Ride safe mate.
 

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Manybeforeus, well said!
I just totaled my 2011 R1 at the track in May. It was my first bike. I put 12k miles on it before my off. And that was mainly due to mental and physical fatigue at the end of a two day track day weekend. Sometimes it's just better to pack it up and not do those last few sessions lol. Luckily I eras not injured and my gear worked like it was supposed to. I'm on the fence now between a 675R or the '15 R1. Can't wait to get back out there. Anyway back to the subject - it's all about what you want from your riding experience. Who cares what other people think. I rode my R1 all around town, on long trips up to the mountains, and on the track and never thought it was uncomfortable to ride. All that being said, if I had it to do all over again I would have started on a 600. Just because of the lighter weight bike the learning curve would have been much faster for me.
 

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My first bike was knucklehead rigid with 10 over springer. It was well used and had no front brake. I bought it from a friend who was in a club and wanted me to join up with them. That was 50 years ago this last summer. That was really dangerous compared to my 2015 R1! But I managed to survive that and club riding back in that era is probably a miracle.
It sure wasn't my attitude or skillz that kept me alive.
My R1 is perhaps the safest bike I have ever owner.
 

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I recently bought an R1 as my first bike ... Great machine with a lot of power just take it slow. Respect the bike and power
First and last post on the forum? Hope all is going well with you and your first bike...
 
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They all go the speed limit folks. Start out on one if you have a brain. If not don't.


04 Liquid Silver R1
 
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