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Premium Member
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Thinking about powder coating the stock wheels a matte black when the bike comes in. I don't dislike the blue but i'm not crazy about them and I hate trying to keep wheels clean.

Matte black (i feel) would look good and have a practical side to it.

Am I going against the grain to hard here (resale in mind)?
 

Premium Member
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Gloss black with a clear coat is easier to maintain.

And I see nothing wrong with powder coating the wheels. I'm not to crazy about the blue either.
My beemer has gloss black wheels and theyre dirty within 20 miles. My track bike had matte black and I never cleaned them.

I honestly could do without all the blue.
 

Premium Member
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My beemer has gloss black wheels and theyre dirty within 20 miles. My track bike had matte black and I never cleaned them.

I honestly could do without all the blue.
When I said maintain, I meant the ability to buff out scratches. It's hard to touch up matte finishes.

And I don't mind if I pick up a little dirt on any of my rides. I clean my bike after every ride.
 

Back to the Yamaha community.
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Thinking about powder coating the stock wheels a matte black when the bike comes in. I don't dislike the blue but i'm not crazy about them and I hate trying to keep wheels clean.

Matte black (i feel) would look good and have a practical side to it.

Am I going against the grain to hard here (resale in mind)?
If you do anything just scuff and paint the wheels. I stripped a few sets of Marchesini magnesium wheels on a RS250R, had them powder coated and the wheel corroded under the coating after a few months. They looked like shit afterwards and I don't know if I or the company applying the coating caused the problem. When I spoke to Ted from TAW wheels he mentioned the problem was removing the paint removes the pickling or primer used to seal the wheel from corrosion. It was an expensive lesson to learn.
 

Motorcycle Builder/Fabricator
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I just wanted to make mention. If you have to disassemble these wheels for powdercoat, you will have a problem with the rear wheel. One of the wheel bearings is held in by a threaded retaining ring. THREADS ARE REVERSE/LEFTIE THREADS. It will also require a special tool to remove it. This relates to the 2015 model only. The dealers do not have this tool yet either. You will have to fabricate your own tool to remove it or wait till the tool becomes available. I made the tool and wheels are at the powdercoater's. I'll post pics when they're done.

Homemade tool and retaining ring:

 

Greenfield, MN(55357)
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I just wanted to make mention. If you have to disassemble these wheels for powdercoat, you will have a problem with the rear wheel. One of the wheel bearings is held in by a threaded retaining ring. THREADS ARE REVERSE/LEFTIE THREADS. It will also require a special tool to remove it. This relates to the 2015 model only. The dealers do not have this tool yet either. You will have to fabricate your own tool to remove it or wait till the tool becomes available. I made the tool and wheels are at the powdercoater's. I'll post pics when they're done.

Homemade tool and retaining ring:

Very informative! Quite the craftsman as well, awesome job! What color are you having your wheels done?

-John
 

Hope is what makes us Human.
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No!
save your money and buy CF :fact:
 

Motorcycle Builder/Fabricator
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Very informative! Quite the craftsman as well, awesome job! What color are you having your wheels done?

-John
Thanks John. Color will be, should be, hopefully be, the same color as the coolant tube: Candy apple red. Powder coater seemed pretty confident. Fingers crossed!

 

O'Gradys Paint
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Have them painted. It is certainly not worth the hassle to have them powder coated for a measly difference in durability. You save the risk in baking them (altering them in any way, possibly weakening them making them softer or more brittle), you retain the original prep (sealers/primers for adhesion and protection) and you get a nicer finish with paint.
IMO you'd have to be fairly ignorant to insist on powder over paint once you consider these things. Do you really want to remove bearings, make special tools and risk possible damage/corrosion and adhesion issues for a finish that's 19.6% less likely to scratch when you drop a wrench on them?
 

Motorcycle Builder/Fabricator
Joined
35 Posts
Have them painted. It is certainly not worth the hassle to have them powder coated for a measly difference in durability. You save the risk in baking them (altering them in any way, possibly weakening them making them softer or more brittle), you retain the original prep (sealers/primers for adhesion and protection) and you get a nicer finish with paint.
IMO you'd have to be fairly ignorant to insist on powder over paint once you consider these things. Do you really want to remove bearings, make special tools and risk possible damage/corrosion and adhesion issues for a finish that's 19.6% less likely to scratch when you drop a wrench on them?
I personally am not locked into any particular route. Paint, powder, anodize, chrome, whatever suits you for your end result. No ignorance here. The only thing I insist on is quality.

BTW, you should see my collection of my own specialty tools :thumbup
 

General User
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Have them painted. It is certainly not worth the hassle to have them powder coated for a measly difference in durability. You save the risk in baking them (altering them in any way, possibly weakening them making them softer or more brittle), you retain the original prep (sealers/primers for adhesion and protection) and you get a nicer finish with paint.
IMO you'd have to be fairly ignorant to insist on powder over paint once you consider these things. Do you really want to remove bearings, make special tools and risk possible damage/corrosion and adhesion issues for a finish that's 19.6% less likely to scratch when you drop a wrench on them?
You don't get a nicer finish than paint, if you have a proper powder coater do it. We've coated our wheels, going on 10+ years in a racing application, with no issues, ever.

If removing and installing bearings isn't your cup of tea, pay a few bucks to have someone else do it.
 
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