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Venom X/O
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Sportbiketireservice
Mainly a Michelin dealer. The guy (Dave) seems to know his stuff pretty good. Suspension and tire wear wise.
Typically if your local guys have a specific brand you can always trust those tires. At the top level the tires are all the same with minor variances.
 

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Track days are a lot of work and I’m beat. But they’re definitely a lot of fun. I really need to get a dedicated track bike and then a street bike. I have 2 currently but I’m just not in love with my other bike (2004 CBR 1000RR). If I could find another 2006 R1 in very good condition I’d buy it up instantly...
Track days are a lot of work! And it's easy to get tired, but there are also things that riders do when riding track days that can result in them using MORE energy than needed. What are some things you think riders do during track days that expends more energy than needed? How track riders reduce the amount of energy spent while riding?
 

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Discussion Starter · #105 ·
Track days are a lot of work! And it's easy to get tired, but there are also things that riders do when riding track days that can result in them using MORE energy than needed. What are some things you think riders do during track days that expends more energy than needed? How track riders reduce the amount of energy spent while riding?
Good question. I have a pretty good setup. Toy hauler camper, A/C, big generator, lots of shade between 2EZ Ups and the camper awning. I did do a tire change in the heat so that is extra energy. I can’t imagine some of these guys in 90+ heat with just an EZUp at this point in my life. I hide out in the A/C for a few minutes after coming off track.

I also switch my bike from street to track form so that’s work beforehand. Plus loading up with food for the weekend, just the whole process to get the setup at the track with working what amounts to 2 jobs all the time (my personal problem, like money too much to not work all the time).

To me, the work is getting there all prepared and ready to go. Once I’m there, it’s minimal, other than dealing with the heat in full gear. Is what it is. If it wasn’t worth it, I wouldn’t do it. Also, the physical exertion. I’m good at staying hydrated and nourished ( which is probably a lot of people’s shortcomings at a track day). Nothing is more important than fluids and some decent fruit or whatever to keep sharp. Good way to crash is to get too physically drained. It happend twice in the last session of the I group on Saturday and both were due to physical/mental breakdowns due to the heat.
 

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I’m one of the guys with only a pop up. My buddy has the RV with AC, it’s nice! I feel spoiled on the very rare occasion he actually comes out and even still the heat plus full gear gets me. I’m usually able to pace myself so I’m not destroyed but last Friday I was signed up for the entire day but only made it until lunch due to a chronic stomach thing that just zapped my energy. On a good day though, even with pacing myself, I’m a zombie on the drive home and typically crash when I get home. I’m doing Fri-Sun this weekend, lol. I might drop dead at the track.

My personal rule is if I make 3 mistakes due to physical/mental exhaustion, I’m done for the day, regardless of the time.
 

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Astronomer not Astrologer
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I think @misty Hurst meant things like moving back to center every time between corners rather than staying to the side if there is a corner cming up that is in the same direction. Or not using your legs AND arms to brace for heavy braking zones.
 
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Discussion Starter · #109 ·
I think @misty Hurst meant things like moving back to center every time between corners rather than staying to the side if there is a corner cming up that is in the same direction. Or not using your legs AND arms to brace for heavy braking zones.
Correct. I believe that was the intention of the question. Was just giving my personal opinion on the subject.

I’m pretty good at not weighting my arms/hands under heavy braking. I’ve worked on that a lot in the past and have it down as second nature now. Although that’s probably a big one for some people. I always find it funny when a cruiser/Harley type of rider gets on a sport bike and hates it because of all the weight on their wrists. Duh. You’re doing it wrong. Should be able to ride around with just your thumb and forefinger barely touching the grips.

Definitely feel it in my legs and now my knees after a day of track riding. Lots of transfer left and right. Although I feel like that’s the right way to be riding. Any differing opinions on that?

Mainly it’s the heat that gets my while actually riding. It always seems to be close to 90° when I’m at a track day for some reason. 75° and partly cloudy would be nice sometimes...
 

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I think @misty Hurst meant things like moving back to center every time between corners rather than staying to the side if there is a corner cming up that is in the same direction. Or not using your legs AND arms to brace for heavy braking zones.
Yes, exactly. I was asking about what kind of RIDING techniques can help you conserve energy, especially for riding on super hot days. One thing for sure is not moving back to the center of the seat each time if the corner coming up is in the same direction as the previous one. We call it, "number of movements" at the Superbike School.

Basically, you want to make sure that you are aware of how often you are moving around on the bike and conscious of the fact that the more you move around, the more energy you waste and the more tired you become. Sometimes I ride behind my students in awe. I'll be using only one or two gears to follow them, based on the pace they are going, and I'll watch them switch gears a million times, move from side to side on the bike nonstop, sit up to brake, tuck really far down to the corner and make about a hundred different movements on the bike while I stay virtually in the same place, relaxed as can be. They will come back in huffing and puffing with a red face, exhausted from strangling the bike and dancing around so much and wonder why they are so exhausted. We will sometimes do comparison videos then, of how much I move around on the bike vs how much they move around. It's pretty amazing to watch their reactions to that one sometimes, like, wow, I had no idea I was moving around THAT MUCH!!!

So, on top of reducing the number of movements you make on the bike what other techniques can help reduce fatigue while riding?

Correct. I believe that was the intention of the question. Was just giving my personal opinion on the subject.

I’m pretty good at not weighting my arms/hands under heavy braking. I’ve worked on that a lot in the past and have it down as second nature now. Although that’s probably a big one for some people. I always find it funny when a cruiser/Harley type of rider gets on a sport bike and hates it because of all the weight on their wrists. Duh. You’re doing it wrong. Should be able to ride around with just your thumb and forefinger barely touching the grips.

Definitely feel it in my legs and now my knees after a day of track riding. Lots of transfer left and right. Although I feel like that’s the right way to be riding. Any differing opinions on that?

Mainly it’s the heat that gets my while actually riding. It always seems to be close to 90° when I’m at a track day for some reason. 75° and partly cloudy would be nice sometimes...
Great! On those hot days are you just drinking water or do you add some electrolyte mixtures? We use Scratch Labs hydration mix at the Superbike School- I notice a huge difference in my energy level when I don't drink it. Just a thought :)
 
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