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In order of usefulness to your adaptation and lap times

1) track tires
2) Suspension
3) Brake Lines and Brembo MC
4) Quick turn throttle (believe it or not, this actually help a lot with braking so that its easier to get from full throttle to brakes faster
5) exhaust
6) Rear sets
7) Steering dampner
8) Track body work
 

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1) track tires - dunlop or Pirelli - pirelli's are usually a little stickier but wear out faster while dunlop's offer great grip and last longer
2) Suspension - start off with AK fronts and penske rear (Gp or ohlins are more expensive but better)
3) Brake Lines and Brembo MC (Steel braided, brand not that important)
4) Quick turn throttle (believe it or not, this actually help a lot with braking so that its easier to get from full throttle to brakes faster (I think alot of people use Motionpro)
5) exhaust (I like M4 personally, they are reasonably priced and the same quality as bigger names)
6) Rear sets (stay away from Vortex, they will chew through your boots, go with Woodcraft)
7) Steering dampner (Ohlins only)
8) Track body work - Sharkinz are great
 

· go go juice gonna make me win
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for me it kinda depends on your skill level. ie, don't need slicks if you aren't at that pace. i did things out of order, but if i was building a track bike at the novice or slow/med intermediate level, i'd focus on things way differently.

- capable tires are a must, but i've used q2 and still use q3's, and don't plan on swapping until in advanced.
- rearsets, primarily for the ability to gp shift, but also adjustability and replacement parts.
- quick shifter, i'm still trying to get it tuned in, but man it's fun to bang through the gears.

for me, those were the big things that i really enjoyed having even as a rookie novice. i had brake lines and quick throttle and track body work and stuff like that already done, but starting out i wouldn't prioritize that if i were doing it again.

the rest i think is great as you get better and better and push harder.
 

· SCORPION ON R1
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks DallastxR1 n tnole ?

Tyres - Pirelli Super Diablo Corsa ( CAN WE PUT 200 in rear instead ? )

Rear sets - planning for Lightech or Valtermoto

Bodywork - Does that make a difference in performance? I don't mind keeping the originals.

Steering Dampner - Ohlins

Quick Shifter - I m planning Bazzaz as I have heard they have with ABS for non ABS bikes

Brakes - I want the Brembo kit but what's there in the kit n what does it cost?




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· Venom X/O
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I'd start with seat time and basic suspension setup.

Then:

Track plastics - the cheaper the better
Suspension - correct springs
Brakes - brake lines and brake pads
Tires - I'm a huge Dunlop fan. They work great
Master cyl - huge amount of options. Don't get suckered into "if it isn't brembo it isn't shiz." Accossato is a great alternative :fact

Then after that you'll be well enough to decide on your own :yesnod

Happy hunting :thumbup
 

· My R1 eats you.
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lots of good advice on here already. just a couple of quick points.

As to rearsets, it's a track bike so go for sturdy not pretty. Woodcraft are a good choice there among others.

as to the tires, Pirelli's and Dunlops are both great but they act entirely differently In terms of suspension setup. so if it comes down to those figure out which one you want to run before putting a lot of time effort and money into setting up your suspension.

the bazazz quickshifter works well and is programmable.

don't worry about slicks until you're fast intermediate. once you're running in A group, run slicks with warmers if you can afford it.

And don't skimp on good gear including back and chest protectors.

and practice practice practice...
 

· Speed Rules
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I'd start with seat time and basic suspension setup.

Then:

Track plastics - the cheaper the better
Suspension - correct springs
Brakes - brake lines and brake pads
Tires - I'm a huge Dunlop fan. They work great
Master cyl - huge amount of options. Don't get suckered into "if it isn't brembo it isn't shiz." Accossato is a great alternative :fact

Then after that you'll be well enough to decide on your own :yesnod

Happy hunting :thumbup
This is exactly the order I would go in, except I'd probably put a steering damper on there first. IMO, learning to ride the bike bone stock is valuable so as you stick upgrades on it, you get an understanding of what each one does and how it affects the bike.
 

· go go juice gonna make me win
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Thanks DallastxR1 n tnole ��
Bodywork - Does that make a difference in performance? I don't mind keeping the originals.

performance wise, no. the main thing with that would be durability in a crash. you can use oem, but if you're willing to trash it you'd be better off selling it. from what i've seen, sharkskinz and armour bodies hold up the best and can survive a few lowsides and be fine. again, the intent is to protect the bike and not completely disintegrate. for the price difference, which i've seen is only a couple hundred bucks, i'd get a nice, well fitting set.

Steering Dampner - Ohlins

just to throw out hyperpro as an option. i got it because it was cheaper, and it's been great. easily adjustible and proven durable, in the 5 years or so i've had it. hopefully trend continues.

Brakes - I want the Brembo kit but what's there in the kit n what does it cost?

you talking about calipers or master cylinder? caliper set is couple grand, mc is about 350 or so. right now i have the mc, braided lines, pf pads, and fresh fluid, brakes are great.



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And don't skimp on good gear including back and chest protectors.
gear, ya, find deals but don't lower the standard too much. boots tho, i'd be careful getting significantly used or a knock off. i got a knock off and they completely fell apart after maybe 5 trackdays. everything coming unglued. bit the bullet and paid for some nice sidis, lesson learned.
 

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I just did this to a 08 that I brought back from the dead over the winter. The first thing I did was to change out the front brake lines and add a Penske rear shock. I also changed the gearing and added a new set of tires. I rode it this past weekend and realized that the next thing that needs to be done is to get some rearsets as my toes were dragging right with my knee. I will eventually revalve the forks and then sell the street body work and replace it with race body work but decided that doing that was low on my list of priorities. The last thing on my list is to do the exhaust and add a bazazz system.
 

· Venom X/O
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There is no right or wrong track bodywork. I bought the cheap stuff and it held up for two crashes so far, and is still ready for more. Godfather race fairings gets my vote.

As for the comment on a steering damper, I wouldn't make that a super huge priority. There's a lot of debate on them, but one thing is certain and it's that it isn't a necessity. It helps in situations where the front goes nuts, but even a damper can't no tank slappers or big wobbles. I think correct bike setup and suspension is leaps and bounds ahead of tires and damper. Next would be brakes, then tires and small stuff like dampers, quick shifters, or exhaust for that matter. A fresh set of q3's can take some serious abuse, trust me :fact
 

· Banned
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You already received a lot of bad advice so it's time for a good one.
No 1 Your bike setup - frame geometry (swingarm angle, & rake) and ergonomics to suit your riding position on the bike. Plenty of info available on correct angles for handling and it does not cost a lot to make it right.
No 2 Suspension. You will get nowhere with the best tires if your suspension does not work as it should. That means correct springs for your weight front & back with the sag in correct range. Many tracks offer a suspension setting service so it is well worth the money to use it. Not sure if Dave Moss is visiting India yet. :smily005:
No 3 Learn to ride fast correctly. No offence, but track is not like street only faster. Not sure what you have available locally. Is CSS active in India? At the very last get some of the Keith Codes books and read it thoroughly. Be smart first and brave second. Otherwise, if not destroy your bike you will just scare yourself or someone else.
No 4 Tires. Do not try to save money on a good tires. Dunlop's are excellent. Stay away from slicks until you lap times are within 10-15 seconds of the track record. Spend money on a good tire gauge and keep an eye for correct pressures.
No 5 Racing fairings. You want to loose some weight - lights, mirrors, indicators etc. Everything that does not makes the engine run comes off.
No 6 If you can afford it get a data acquisition system. Does not have to be very sophisticated and a lot of dash manufacturers like Starlane for example include many functions that will help you to be faster. The point is, you need to know what you and your bike is doing on the track. Not what you think or someone told you, but hard, objective data. You analyse, learn, change and try again. Otherwise you just doing laps which is OK but only if that's what you want.
No 6 Bling - rearsets, grips, levers etc. Do not make the bike any faster but looking better (sometimes)

Do not forget to enjoy your riding and always keep the shiny side up.
 

· Moderator - In Memorium
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Step one: go to a track day and see if you like it
Step two: go to a race school and learn properly before learning all "the right stuff" from the wrong people
Step three: all that other stuff (starting with chassis and tires)

Rinse and repeat.
 
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